The North Carolina

 

 

 

Visitor Center

Pitt

Cities and Towns in Pitt County

Click on the towns below to visit their websites

    Ayden

    Bethel

    Falkland

    Farmville

    Fountain

    Greenville

    Grifton

    Grimesland

    Simpson

    Stokes

    Winterville


Pitt County Political Parties

Education

K-12

A. G. Cox Middle (6-8)
Tracy Cole-Williams, Principal
School Website

252-756-3105

Ayden Elementary (K-5)
Teresa Byrum, Principal
School Website

252-746-2121

Ayden-Grifton High (9-12)
Bill Frazier, Principal
School Website

252-746-4183

Ayden Middle (6-8)
Seth Brown, Principal
School Website

252-746-3672

Belvoir Elementary (K-5)
Sandra Morris, Principal
School Website

252-752-6365

Bethel School (K-8)
Betty Tolar, Prinicpal
School Website

252-825-3801

C. M. Eppes Middle (6-8)
Charlie Langley, Principal
School Website

252-757-2160

Chicod School (K-8)
Glenn Joyner, Principal
School Website

252-746-6742

Creekside Elementary (K-5)
Carla Frinkso, Princpal
School Website

252-353-5253

D. H. Conley High (9-12)
Mary Carter, Principal
School Website

252-756-3440

E. B. Aycock Middle (6-8)
Julie Cary, Principal
School Website

252-756-4181

Eastern Elementary (K-5)
Nicole Smith, Principal
School Website

252-758-4813

Elmhurst Elementary (K-5)
Donna Gillam, Principal
School Website

252-756-0180

Falkland Elementary (K-5)
Dennis Teel, Principal
School Website

252-752-7820

Farmville Central High (9-12)
Christopher Moxley, Principal
School Website

252-753-5138

Farmville Middle (6-8)
Lionel Kato, Principal,
School Website

252-753-2116

G. R. Whitfield School (K-8)
Dr. Gloria Snead, Principal
School Website

252-752-6614

Grifton School (K-8)
Ronda Sortino, Principal
School Website

252-524-5141

H. B. Sugg Elementary (K-2)
Valerie Galberth, Prinicpal
School Website

252-753-2671

Hope Middle School (6-8)
Mike Lutz, Principal
School Website

252-355-7071

J. H. Rose High (9-12)
Dr. George Frazier, Principal
School Website

252-321-3640

North Pitt High (9-12)
Marty Baker, Principal
School Website

252-825-0054

Northwest Elementary (K-5)
Charles Chestnut, Principal
School Website

252-752-6329

Pactolus School (K-8)
Dr. Joseph Nelson, Principal
School Website

252-752-6941

Ridgewood Elementary School (K-5)
Cheryl Olmsted, Principal
School Website

252-355-7879

Sadie Saulter Elementary (K-5)
Ferdonia Stewart, Principal
School Website

252-758-4621

Sam D. Bundy Elementary (3-5)
Valerie Galberth, Principal
School Website

252-753-2013

South Greenville Elementary (K-5)
LaVette Ford, Principal
School Website

252-756-7004

South Central High (9-12)
John Coleman, Principal
School Website

252-321-3232

Stokes School (K-8)
Jennifer Poplin, Principal
School Website

252-752-6907

Third Street Center (Pre-K)
Judy Beckert-Jones, Site Manager
School Website

252-752-3227

W. H. Robinson Elementary (K-5)
Tiffany Vincent, Principal
School Website

252-756-3707

Wahl-Coates Elementary (K-5)
Will Sanderson, Principal
School Website

252-752-2514

Wellcome Middle (6-8)
Jeff Theus, Principal
School Website

252-752-5938

Wintergreen Intermediate (3-5)
Dawn Singleton, Principal
School Website

252-355-2411

Wintergreen Primary (K-2)
Dawn Singleton, Princpal
School Website

252-353-5270

 

Churches

Allens Chapel             Greenville

 

Al-Masjid Islamic Center and Mosque  

Greenville

 

Andrews Church

Falkland

 

Anointed One Church of Deliverance          

Ayden

 

Arlington Street Baptist Church    

Greenville

 

Ayden First Pentecostal Holiness Church            

Ayden

 

Beacon Church  

Farmville

 

Bell Chapel        

Greenville

 

Belvoir Church 

Greenville

 

Bethany Church  

Greenville

 

Bible Way Church   

Grimesland

 

Boyd Memorial Presbyterian Church  

Greenville

 

Briery Swamp Church            

Leggetts Crossroads

 

Brown Chapel  

Greenville

 

Burys Chapel     

Grimesland

 

Burning Bush Church 

Greenville

 

Calvary Church  

Greenville

 

Calvary Church   

Greenville

 

Carraway Church   

Fountain

 

Carson Memorial Church                     

Greenville

 

Cedar Grove Church 

Greenville

 

Cherry Lane Church  

Greenville

 

Cherry Lane Free Will Baptist Church    

Greenville

 

Cherry Run Church  

Washington

 

Church of Christ   

Greenville

 

Clemons Grove Chapel              

Leggetts Crossroads

 

Community Chapel   

Greenville

 

Community Church  

Farmville

 

Community Church  

Ayden

 

Congregation Bayt Shalom                   

Greenville

 

Coreys Chapel   

Greenville

 

Dildas Grove Church 

Falkland

 

Dildys Chapel    

Falkland

 

Eastern Pines Church of Christ            

Greenville

 

Ebenezer Seventh Day Adventist Church 

Greenville

 

Elm Grove Church   

Ayden

 

Elm Grove Church   

Ayden

 

English Chapel Free Will Church            

Greenville

 

Evangelistic Tabernacle              

Greenville

 

Faith Baptist Church  

Ayden

 

Faith Church      

Greenville

 

Faith Church      

Greenville

 

First Born Church  

Grimesland

 

First Christian Church 

Greenville

 

First FWB Church       

Greenville

 

First Pentacostal Holiness Church        

Greenville

 

First Presbyterian Church                     

Greenville

 

First Swamp Church  

Robersonville West

 

First Wesleyan Church            

Greenville

 

Flemings Chapel   

Greenville

 

Good Hope Church  

Greenville

 

Grifton Pentecostal Holiness Church        

Grifton

 

Grifton United Methodist Church  

Grifton

 

Grimesland Pentecostal Church   

Grimesland

 

Grindle Creek Church 

Greenville

 

Gum Swamp Church 

Greenville

 

Haddock Chapel   

Gardnerville

 

Hancock Church 

Ayden

 

Hayes Chapel    

Leggetts Crossroads

 

Hickory Grove Church              

Robersonville West

 

Holly Hill Church 

Greenville

 

Hollywood Church  

Greenville

 

Holy Ghost Deliverance Church  

Grimesland

 

Holy Temple     

Greenville

 

Holy Trinity United Holy Church            

Greenville

 

Hooker Memorial Christian Church        

Greenville

 

Hopewell Church 

Greenville

 

House of Prayer  

Gardnerville

 

Howard Hill Church   

Washington

 

Iglesia Pentecostal Unida                     

Greenville

 

Immanual Baptist Church                     

Greenville

 

Immanuel Church   

Greenville

 

Jarvis Memorial Church             

Greenville

 

Jones Chapel     

Grimesland

 

Joseph Branch Church            

Wilmar

 

Jumping Run Church  

Ayden

 

Keysville Church  

Washington

 

Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witness      

Greenville

 

Landmark Church   

Greenville

 

Latterday Saints Church

Greenville

 

Liberty Church  

Ayden

 

Lifegate Church   

Gardnerville

 

Live Oak Church 

 

Lutheran Church of Our Redeemer       

Greenville

 

Marantha FWB Church             

Greenville

 

Marlboro Church  

Farmville

 

Memorial Baptist Church                     

Greenville

 

Monk Memorial Church                      

Falkland

 

Mount Calvary Church             

Greenville

 

Mount Pleasant Church             

Greenville

 

Moyes Chapel 

Farmville

 

New Deliverance Free Will Baptist Church                  

Ayden

 

New Hope Church  

Greenville

 

New Light Church  

Greenville

 

Noahs Ark Fishing Deliverance Church  

Greenville

 

Oak Grove Church  

Robersonville East

 

Oakmont Baptist Church                     

Greenville

 

Open Heart Church of God                 

Ayden

 

Otter Creek Church  

Falkland

 

Our Redeemer Lutheran Church  

Greenville

 

Parkers Chapel F W B Church              

Greenville

 

Peoples Baptist Church              

Greenville

 

Phillippi Church   

Greenville

 

Piney Grove Church  

Greenville

 

Piney Grove Church  

Greenville

 

Pleasant Hill Church 

Gardnerville

 

Pleasant Plains Church            

Ayden

 

Poplar Hill Church   

Gardnerville

 

Post Oak Grove Church                      

Greenville

 

Potters Place     

Greenville

 

Red Banks Church   

Greenville

 

Red Oak Church   

Greenville

 

Reedy Branch Church 

Greenville

 

Reid Chapel     

Fountain

 

River View Church   

Washington

 

Rock Spring Church 

Greenville

 

Rose Hill Church  

Gardnerville

 

Saint Gabriels Catholic Church  

Greenville

 

Saint James Church  

Fountain

 

Saint James Methodist Church  

Greenville

 

Saint Johns Church    

Greenville

 

Saint Johns Church  

Falkland

 

Saint Johns Church   

Farmville

 

Saint Jude Church  

Ayden

 

Saint Mary Church   

Greenville

 

Saint Paul Church     

Greenville

 

Saint Pauls Episcopal Church               

Greenville

 

Saint Peter Church    

Greenville

 

Saint Peters Catholic Church                

Greenville

 

Saint Peters Church 

Falkland

 

Saint Peters Missionary Baptist Church              

Greenville

 

Selma Free Will Baptist Church           

Greenville

 

Seven Holly Church   

Falkland

 

Seventh Day Advent Church                

Greenville

 

Shiloh Church    

Fort Barnwell

 

South Greenville Church of Christ        

Greenville

 

Spiritual Life Church  

Gardnerville

 

Sweet Gum Grove Church                   

Greenville

 

Sweet Hope Church  

Greenville

 

Sycamore Chapel   

Greenville

 

Sycamore Hill Baptist Church              

Greenville

 

Tabernacle Church  

Wilmar

 

Temple Church  

Greenville

 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints                       

Greenville

 

The Memorial Baptist Church              

Greenville

 

Timothy Church 

Gardnerville

 

Trinity Free Will Baptist Church           

Greenville

 

Triumph Church  

Grimesland

 

Truth Temple Church of God               

Greenville

 

Tysons Church    

Farmville

 

Union Grove Church  

Leggetts Crossroads

 

Union Grove Church  

Falkland

 

Unity FWB Church   

Greenville

 

University Church   

Greenville

 

Wares Chapel  

Washington

 

Warren Church  

Greenville

 

Wells Chapel Church of God               

Greenville

 

White Oak Church  

Grimesland

 

Zion Chapel       

Old Sparta

 

Zion Chapel       

Ayden

 

Zion Hill Church   

Greenville

History of Pitt County


John Hardy House

The act establishing Pitt County authorized the courts to be held at the home of John Hardy until a courthouse could be built. It also directed the justices to contract for the construction of the courthouse, prison, and stocks on John Hardy's land on the south side of the Tar River, near the chapel known as Hardy's Chapel. In 1771, Martinsborough was established on Richard Evan's land, and in 1774, the courthouse, prison, and stocks were moved to Martinsborough. Court was held at the home of John Lessley until the new courthous, prison, and stocks were completed. In 1787, Martinsborough was changed to Greenesville, later shortened to Greenville, which has been the county seat ever since.


In 1714, Louis Duvall received a royal grant to the land where the first bluffs rise along the banks of the Tar River, and it was there that the first English settlement within what has become Pitt County, North Carolina was established. Duvall called his home Mount Calvert. In the 286 years since, that land has been called other names: Salter's Ferry, Boyd's Ferry, Nelsonville, and Elksville are some of them. Today it is Grimesland.

Among those early English colonists was a woman from Bristol whose brother, Edward Teach, lived in Bath. Today, Mr. Teach is more widely known as "Blackbeard," one of history's most notorious pirates and an American legend. Although most of his activities were concentrated in the Pamlico Sound, it is said that Blackbeard often climbed a cypress tree on the banks of the Tar near Grimesland to survey shipping on the river for potential plunder. A few years after Duvall died, his daughter sold Mount Calvert to Edward Salter and it soon became known as Salter's Ferry. By 1752, it contained a bustling tobacco inspection station and a warehouse. In 1768, a mail route was established between Williamsburg, Virginia and Charleston, South Carolina which passed over Salter's Ferry. This route soon developed into the main conduit for land travel between those important cities and the little settlement on the Tar River thrived.

It was during the 1760s that Dempsie Grimes came from Norfolk County in Virginia to begin a plantation called "Avon" near Salter's Ferry. His son, William Grimes, bought more land lower down the Tar River from "Avon" and he established another plantation which he called "Grimesland." William Grimes had a son named Bryan Grimes and a grandson named Bryan Grimes for whom the present-day town of Grimesland is named.

A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Bryan Grimes, Jr. prospered as a planter. He enjoyed enough prominence and esteem to be elected as a delegate to the state convention which voted North Carolina out of the Union in May 1861 and ratified the constitution of the Confederate States of America. That same month Grimes received a major's commission in the 4th North Carolina Regiment. Although he lacked military training and possessed a quick and fiery temper, Grimes demonstrated skill, judgment and courage throughout his service with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and received rapid promotion. He commanded the 4th North Carolina at Seven Pines (where every other officer in the regiment was killed), Mechanicsville, and Chancellorsville. He led a brigade at Fredericksburg. In the Gettysburg campaign, Grimes led North Carolina infantry in the advance element during the invasion of Pennsylvania. During the retreat back into Virginia, he commanded North Carolinians fighting in the rear guard.

He distinguished himself at the fighting in the Wilderness and especially at the "Bloody Angle" during the battle of Spotsylvania after which he received promotion to brigadier general on May 19, 1864. He led a brigade in Early's Valley Campaign and the raid on Washington. After assuming the command of a division at Cedar Creek, Grimes received a second star on February 23, 1865, the last officer in the Army of Northern Virginia to receive promotion to the rank of major general. He led his division in fighting at Petersburg, Fort Stedman, Sayler's Creek, and Appomattox. When notified of Lee's surrender to Grant, Grimes's initial reaction was to take his command, march to North Carolina, join the Confederate troops already there and continue to fight, but another general officer prevailed upon him not to disgrace himself by violating a flag of truce. Grimes surrendered his division with the rest of Lee's shattered army at Appomattox Court House.

"Go home, boys," he told his troops, "and act like men, as you have always done during the war." Grimes rode back to his plantation, resumed farming, and never again took any part in politics. In 1880, he was killed by a man with whom he had a private dispute. In 1887, the little town on the banks of the Tar River first settled by Louis Duvall in 1714 was renamed in honor of Major General Bryan Grimes, Jr., and it has remained Grimesland to this day.

By David W. Trevino


Pitt County got its name from William Pitt, Earl of Chatham. William Pitt was an English statesman and orator, born in London, England. He studied at Oxford University and in 1731, Pitt joined the army. Pitt led the young "Patriot" Whigs and in 1756 became secretary of state, where he was a pro-freedom speaker in British Colonial government. Pitt County was founded in 1760 under British Colonial government. Prior to 1760, there was one large county, Beaufort County, which was split into five smaller counties, Pitt County being one of those smaller counties. Since 1970 Pitt County has operated under County Manager government.
Click Here for an excellent history of Pitt County written in 1910 by Henry T. King. Link is current as of August 2005.

- Source: J.D. Lewis - Little River, SC 
 http://www.carolana.com/

____________________
More Information

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 133,798 people, 52,539 households, and 32,258 families residing in the county. The population density was 205 people per square mile (79/km²). There were 58,408 housing units at an average density of 90 per square mile (35/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 62.08% White, 33.65% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 1.08% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.80% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. 3.15% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 52,539 households out of which 29.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.40% were married couples living together, 14.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.60% were non-families. 28.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.60% under the age of 18, 17.50% from 18 to 24, 29.90% from 25 to 44, 19.40% from 45 to 64, and 9.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 90.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,868, and the median income for a family was $43,971. Males had a median income of $31,962 versus $25,290 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,243. About 13.50% of families and 20.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.60% of those under age 18 and 20.20% of those age 65 or over.