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Randolph

Cities and Towns in 
Randolph  County

Click on the towns below to visit their websites

The Potters of Seagrove

Click here

"Omie Wise"
- read what is known about the Randolph County woman who was the subject of this famous folk ballad
here

Randolph 
County political parties

Democrat

Republican

Libertarian

Schools

High Point University

RANDOLPH COMMUNITY COLLEGE

K- 12

Eastern Randolph Area

Coleridge Elementary School

Eastern Randolph High School

Franklinville Elementary School

Grays Chapel Elementary School

Liberty Elementary School

Northeastern Randolph Middle School

Ramseur Elementary School

Southeastern Randolph Middle School

 

Randleman Area

Level Cross Elementary

New Market Elementary School

Providence Grove High School

Randleman Elementary School

Randleman Middle School

Randleman High School

 

 

Southwestern Randolph Area

Farmer Elementary School

Seagrove Elementary School

Southmont Elementary School

Southwestern Randolph Middle School

Southwestern Randolph High School

Tabernacle Elementary School

Uwharrie Middle School

 

 

Trinity Area

Archdale Elementary School

A-T Middle School

Braxton Craven Middle School

Hopewell Elementary School

John Lawrence Elementary School

Trindale Elementary School

Trinity Elementary School

Trinity High School

 

 

Non-Traditional Schools

Randolph Early College High School

Private Schools

 Fayetteville St. Christian School

Mount Calvary Christian School


Dove Christain Academy

Ramseur, NC
(336) 824-2731

Brandon Day School
1013 Callahan Street
Archdale, NC
(336) 431-0425


Chimneylane Christian Academy
622 Pleasant Cross Road
Asheboro, NC
(336) 629-5209

Level Cross Christian School  

 

 

Churches

Andrews Grove Church  

Fair Grove

 

Antioch Church  

Erect

 

Antioch Church  

Seagrove

 

Back Creek Church  

Farmer

 

Bethany Church  

Liberty

 

Bethel Church  

Ramseur

 

Bethel Church  

Climax

 

Bethel Church  

Farmer

 

Beulah Church  

Bennett

 

Browers Church  

Asheboro

 

Browers Pilgrim Church  

Asheboro

 

Callicutts Church  

Eleazer

 

Calvary Gospel Church  

Handy

 

Caraway Church  

Glenola

 

Cedar Square Church  

Pleasant Garden

 

Center Cross Church  

Seagrove

 

Charlotte Church  

Asheboro

 

Clear View Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Cool Springs Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Cox Chapel  

Coleridge

 

Crestview Church  

Asheboro

 

Deep River Tabernacle  

High Point East

 

Dogwood Acres Church  

Asheboro

 

Ebenezer Church  

High Point East

 

Emmanuel Church  

Seagrove

 

Fairview Church  

Seagrove

 

Fairview Church  

Glenola

 

Faith Temple Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Flag Springs Church  

Seagrove

 

Forest Park Church  

Randleman

 

Free Grace Church  

Denton

 

Free Wesleyan Church  

Denton

 

Fulp Church  

Seagrove

 

Galilee Church  

Pleasant Garden

 

Garren Grove Church  

Farmer

 

Giles Chapel  

Asheboro

 

Gospel Church  

Ramseur

 

Gospel Tabernacle  

Farmer

 

Grace Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Gravel Hill Church  

Handy

 

Harshaw Church  

Randleman

 

High Pine Church  

Eleazer

 

High Rock Church  

Denton

 

Hilltop Church  

Asheboro

 

Holly Chapel  

Liberty

 

Holly Springs Church  

Ramseur

 

Hoovers Grove Church  

Farmer

 

Hopewell Church  

Farmer

 

Hopewell Church  

Glenola

 

Hughes Grove Baptist Church  

Fair Grove

 

Huldah Church  

Seagrove

 

Jackson Creek Church  

Denton

 

Kildee Wesleyan Church  

Coleridge

 

Liberty Church  

Handy

 

Liberty Grove Church  

Glenola

 

Liberty Grove Church  

Liberty

 

Louise Grove Church  

Liberty

 

Macedonia Church  

Kimesville

 

Maple Springs Church  

Bennett

 

Maple Springs Church  

Seagrove

 

Marlboro Church  

Glenola

 

Midway Church  

Randleman

 

Mitchell Church  

Seagrove

 

Mount Gilead Church  

Glenola

 

Mount Lebanon Church  

Eleazer

 

Mount Olivet Church  

Erect

 

Mount Olivet Church  

Liberty

 

Mount Olivet Church  

Glenola

 

Mount Pleasant Church  

Glenola

 

Mount Pleasant Church  

Liberty

 

Mount Shepherd Church  

Farmer

 

Mount Taber Church  

Ramseur

 

Mount Tabor Church  

Denton

 

Mount Vernon Church  

Glenola

 

Mount Zion Church  

Bennett

 

Mount Zion Church  

Fair Grove

 

New Center Church  

Erect

 

New Hope Church  

Handy

 

New Hope Church  

Seagrove

 

New Salem Church  

Randleman

 

New Union Church  

Farmer

 

Oak Grove Church  

Eleazer

 

Oakwood Park Church  

Asheboro

 

Old Fashion Church  

Denton

 

Old Union Church  

Randleman

 

Olivers Chapel  

Liberty

 

Panther Creek Church  

Erect

 

Patterson Grove Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Pierce Church  

Denton

 

Pilot View Church  

High Point West

 

Piney Grove Church  

Denton

 

Piney Ridge Church  

Erect

 

Pisgah Church  

Seagrove

 

Pleasant Cross Church  

Ramseur

 

Pleasant Grove Church  

Bennett

 

Pleasant Grove Church  

Denton

 

Pleasant Hill Church  

Seagrove

 

Pleasant Hill Church  

Erect

 

Pleasant Hill Church  

Bennett

 

Pleasant Hill Church  

Fair Grove

 

Pleasant Ridge Church  

Ramseur

 

Pleasant Union Church  

Farmer

 

Poplar Ridge Church  

Glenola

 

Prospect Church  

High Point West

 

Providence Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Randolph Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Randolph Church  

High Point East

 

Redcross Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Redeem Church  

Erect

 

Rehobeth Church  

Coleridge

 

Richland Church  

Asheboro

 

Riverside Church  

Bennett

 

Russells Grove Church  

Asheboro

 

Saint Marks Church  

Farmer

 

Saint Peters Church  

Randleman

 

Salem Church  

Handy

 

Salem Church  

Denton

 

Sandy Creek Church  

Grays Chapel

 

Sandy Creek Mission  

Grays Chapel

 

Sawyersville Church  

Farmer

 

Science Hill Church  

Farmer

 

Shady Grove Church  

Liberty

 

Shiloh Church  

Climax

 

Shiloh Church  

Erect

 

Smyrna Grove Church  

Farmer

 

South Plainfield Church  

Randleman

 

Spoons Chapel  

Ramseur

 

Stouts Chapel  

Ramseur

 

Strieby Church  

Eleazer

 

Tabernacle Church  

Denton

 

Trindale Church  

Glenola

 

Trinity Church  

Erect

 

Union Grove Church  

Erect

 

West Chapel  

Asheboro

 

Westfield Church  

Fair Grove

 

Whispering Pines Church  

Asheboro

 

White Hall Church  

Randleman

 

Whites Memorial Church  

Grays Chapel

 

 

Note on Churches:  North Carolina is blessed to boast hundreds of churches in every county.  We make every effort to list each church in each county.  If your church is not listed in our directory, please let us know.
History of Randolph

The act establishing the county authorized the first court and all subsequent courts to be held at the home of Abraham Reese unless otherwise decided upon by the justices of the peace until a courthouse could be built. Commissioners were named in 1783 to select a site for the county seat. This act directed that court be held at the home of William Bell until the courthouse was completed. In 1785, an act was passed removing the court from the home of William Bell and allowing the justices to decide where the next court would meet until the courthouse was completed. In 1788, a town was established at the courthouse on the land of Thomas Dauggan. This town was named Johnstonville in honor of Samuel Johnston. In 1791, an act was passed authorizing the construction of a prison at the courthouse. In 1792, an act was passed authorizing commissioners to select a site in the center of the county and have a new courthouse erected, as the old courthouse was not in the center of the county. In 1796, Asheborough was established as the county seat on the land of Jesse Henley. In 1819, a new courthouse was authorized to be built in Asheborough. Asheboro has been the county seat ever since.


Randolph County was formed in 1779 from Guilford County. It was named in honor of Peyton Randolph, member of the notable Virginia family. He was first president of the Continental Congress (1774-75). Randolph County is in the central section of the state and is bounded by Chatham, Moore, Montgomery, Davidson, Guilford, and Alamance Counties. Its present area is 790 square miles. Asheboro was established as the county seat on the land of Jesse Henley in 1796. A new courthouse was authorized to be built in 1819 at Asheboro. The average elevation of Randolph County is 870 feet above sealevel.
Randolph County is a part of the largest metropolitan area located entirely within North Carolina. There are ten individually-listed National Register properties in the county. They include the Deep River-Columbia Manufacturing Company in Ramseur, the Pisgah Covered Bridge, and three archaeological sites. There also are two districts listed in the National Register in Coleridge and Franklinville. A 1997 state grant is assisting preparation of a National Register nomination for the Liberty Historic District.

 

Randolph County has twenty townships or subdivisions. Trinity is the largest township in terms of population: 23,838. Randolph County is home to the North Carolina State Zoological Park, destined to become the world's largest natural habitat zoo, the Uwharrie National Forest, the Richard Petty Museum, home of NASCAR's all-time career victory leader, and the Seagrove area potteries, which enjoy an international reputation for exceptional hand thrown pottery.

Archdale, originally Bush Hill, was dominated by Quakers, and this led to a change in the name to honor John Archdale, Quaker Governor of North Carolina (1694-96).

Asheboro (originally Asheborough) was named for Samuel Ashe, governor (1795-98).

Central Falls was named for the waterfall on Deep River.

Erect honors the eminent posture of a native, one Tom Bray.

Franklinville was named for Jesse Franklin, North Carolina Governor (1820-21).

Liberty, once Liberty Oak, named (perhaps) because Union soldiers camped here during negotiations between Sherman and Johnston for surrender of the Confederate Army.

Ramseur was once Columbia. In 1878, W. H. Watkins and associates bought the mill and changed the name to honor General Stephen D. Ramseur, Watkins' Old Commander.

Seagrove was named for a railway official, Samuel Seagrove.

Randleman's first name was Dicks, named for Peter Dicks, a pioneer mill man. It was renamed for John B. Randleman who with John H. Ferree in 1872, acquired a cotton mill in the town.

Staley was named for Colonel John W. Staley, a Confederate officer.

Whynot's name always puzzles newcomers. For the record, we repeat: At a town meeting, there were so many queries of "Why not name the new town this" or "Why not name the new town that" --all without agreement-- that finally one fellow rose and said, "Why not name the town Whynot and let's go home?"

Worthville was named for either Dr. J. M. or Hal Worth, who built a cotton mill here, or perhaps for Governor Jonathan Worth.

Covered Bridges:

One of Randolph's famous covered bridges remain and will be preserved. It is over a tributary of Little River, 1-1/2 miles from the community of Pisgah, southwest of Asheboro. It is not in use now. Randolph's bridges are "famous" because there were so many of them. In 1933, no less than fifty-one covered bridges were still in existence. There are two explanations given; "Some say it is just because Randolph was a progressive county and wanted to improve communication." Another is that this county has always been "close politically." So the candidates running for office competed with each other in pledging to build bridges.

- Source: J.D. Lewis - Little River, SC 
 http://www.carolana.com/

More Information

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 130,454 people, 50,659 households, and 37,335 families residing in the county. The population density was 166 people per square mile (64/km²). There were 54,422 housing units at an average density of 69 per square mile (27/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 89.20% White, 5.63% Black or African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 3.01% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. 6.63% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

As with much of North Carolina the Latino population of Randolph County continued to grow into the twenty-first century. 2005 figures placed the Latino population as 9.3% of the counties total.

In 2000 there were 50,659 households out of which 33.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.10% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.30% were non-families. 22.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.00% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 23.50% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $38,348, and the median income for a family was $44,369. Males had a median income of $30,575 versus $22,503 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,236. About 6.80% of families and 9.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.60% of those under age 18 and 11.50% of those age 65 or over.

-Source: Wikipedia

The North Carolina Zoo invites you to an adventure as BIG as all outdoors

Visit the North Carolina Zoo for fun with family and friends, for face-to-face animal encounters, to enchant and educate children or perhaps to enjoy the glorious gardens.

Connect with wildlife from two different continents as you explore 500 acres of exhibits carefully constructed to resemble natural habitats.  Walk from Africa’s grasslands to North America’s Arctic coast. 

Learn how the Zoo works to conserve and protect wild things and wild places.

Escape to the forests and streams of North Carolina’s beautiful Central Piedmont.  Located at the foot of the Uwharrie Mountains, the Zoo is just outside the charming southern town of Asheboro.

Discover more than 1,100 animals and 40,000 plants along five miles of shaded pathways.

North Carolina Zoo... connecting your life to wildlife.

Located about 75 miles west of Raleigh in Asheboro, the North Carolina Zoo is nationally recognized as one of the nation's finest zoos. It was the first American zoo designed from its inception around the "natural habitat" philosophy--presenting animals and plants in exhibits that closely resemble the habitats in which they would be found in the wild.

The zoo's animal collections includes about 1,100 speciemens representing about 250 different species of mammals, reptiles, birds and insects. Among the most popular exhibits are those that display polar bears, sea lions, river otters, alligators, elephants, gorillas, baboons, rhinoceros, giraffes, and zebras. The 37-acre African Plains exhibit alone is as large a many entire zoos. The Sonora Desert, an indoor recreation of the famous desert of the American Southwest, is alive with fascinating denizens of that hot, dry climate. The N.C. Zoo is the nation's largest walk-through natural-habitat zoo. Its African and North American exhibit regions span more than 500 acres with more than five miles of walkways.

At the N.C. Zoo, you will see some of the world's rarest wildlife. New at the Zoo is the Watani Grasslands Reserve, an $8.5 million expansion of the park's elephant & rhino exhibits."

North Carolina Zoo
4401 Zoo Parkway
Asheboro, North Carolina 
27205

1.800.488.0444 or 336-879-7000

www.nczoo.org

North Carolina Aviation Museum and Hall of Fame



The NCAM features this famous "Flitfire," flown by Orville Wright in 1943, an S-56 Savoia Marchetti open-cockpit seaplane like the one flown by Smith Reynolds on his 6,000-mile, solo flight from London to Hong Kong in 1931-32, many historical, wartime, experimental, unmanned aircraft and much more!

 

North Carolina Aviation Museum
2222-G
Pilots View Road
Asheboro , NC 27204

Phone: (336) 625-0170
Fax: (336) 625-2984
Email:
ncam@triad.twcbc.com

 

www.ncairmuseum.org

 

Richard Petty Museum



142 W Academy Street
Randleman, NC
27317
www.pettyracing.com

American Classic Motorcycle Museum



The American Classic Motorcycle Museum in Asheboro boasts one of the largest private collections of Harley-Davidson motorcycles in the country. Gift shop and Heritage Diner on site.

 

Operation Mon, 6 am - 2 pm; Tue - Fri, 6 am - 5:30 pm; Sat, 6 am - 4 pm

Admission FREE

 

1170 US Hwy 64 W

Asheboro NC

27205

336-629-9564

More Information

 

 www.american-classic-motorcycle.com

Facebook Page


John Deere Vintage Tractor Museum


Mon - Fri, 10 am - 4 pm; Sat, 9 am - 5 pm; Sun, 2 - 5 pm

Group Tours: By appt only

Admission $4

 

Address 5507 Snyder Country Rd

Trinity NC

27370 

336-861-6959

 

 www.nealsjohndeeretractors.com


North Carolina Pottery Center

 

 The North Carolina Pottery Center showcases the remarkable history and on-going tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. Located in Seagrove, one of the state's key historical and contemporary pottery producing regions, the Center is your first stop in exploring North Carolina's rich clay heritage. The state's pottery communities range form the mountains to the sea, and it is that wide-ranging diversity of styles, techniques, and history that the Center preserves and protects.

 

The Center's permanent exhibit of more than eight hundred pieces of pottery, artifacts, and photographs traces North Carolina's pottery history from prehistoric Native Americans to the present. The display interprets the impact of social, technological, and economic change on the state's most unique cultural resource.

 

Changing exhibitions of historical and contemporary work are also on display.

 

 

Tue - Sat, 10 am - 4 pm

Adults, $2; Youth, 13-18, $1; Under 12, FREE

 

233 East Ave

Seagrove NC

27341 

336-873-8430 

 

www.ncpotterycenter.com  

 

 

Birkhead Mountain Wilderness


Narrative And History of the Wilderness

 

The Birkhead Mountains Wilderness was established by the 1984 North Carolina Wilderness Act. The goals are to protect and preserve its natural resources and wilderness character and provide for public use. The Wilderness includes 5,160 acres at the northern end of the Uwharrie Mountains.

 

These mountains are considered to be the oldest on the North American Continent. Evidence of early Indians dates back over 12,000 years. The Catawba Indians  inhabited the area when the Europeans began exploring the region in the late 1600s. By 1760 settlement had begun in earnest, opened up by the explorers and traders along the Ocaneechi Trail.

 

The Birkhead family raised a son, John Watson (Watt), who was born in 1858. The 3,000 acres that he acquired over the years were made up of many small tenant farms. Thus the mountain range became known locally as the Birkhead Mountains

 

This old plantation is the core of the Wilderness. Remember, as you use the Wilderness, your challenge is to leave no trace of your passing. This will protect and preserve the area as true wilderness. Evidence of early Indians and settlers can often be found. These archeological and historic artifacts and sites hold clues to America's past. If disturbed , a part of our heritage is lost forever. Federal law protects such sites and artifacts on public land. If you discover such remains please leave them undisturbed.

 

All trails within the Wilderness are designated hiking trails. Travel by horse, motorized vehicle or bicycle is prohibited. A detailed map of the Wilderness is available at the District Ranger’s Office.

 

Access:

 

From Troy, NC take Hwy. 109 North to the village of Uwharrie and turn right onto Ophir Road (SR 1134). Ophir Road becomes Burney Mill Road as you cross into Randolph County. Continue on to the intersection of Lassiter Mill Road and turn right. Proceed north on Lassiter Mill to either of the trailhead locations as depicted on the map.

 

From Asheboro, NC take Hwy. 49 South approximately 6 miles. Turn right onto Science Hill Road. About a fourth of a mile further, at the "T" intersection, turn left (south) onto Lassiter Mill Road. Continue on to the two trailhead locations as depicted on the map.

 
http://www.cs.unca.edu/nfsnc/recreation/uwharrie/birkhead_mountain_wilderness.htm

Uwharrie National Forest

The Uwharrie National Forest was first purchased by the federal government in 1931 during the Great Depression. The land was known as the Uwharrie Reservation.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy proclaimed these federal lands in Montgomery, Randolph, and Davidson Counties the Uwharrie National Forest. It is one of the most recently formed in the National Forest System.

Though small, at only 50,189 acres, the Uwharrie  provides a variety of natural resources, including clean rivers and streams, diverse vegetation for scenery, wildlife habitat and wood products. There is also a  wide variety of recreational activities, and the Forest is a  natural setting for tourism and economic development.

Read More

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Pisgah Covered Bridge

 

Pisgah Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the west fork of the Little River in Randolph County, North Carolina. It is the only accessible covered bridge in North Carolina, and one of only two (originally built on public roads) in existence in the state (the other being Bunker Hill covered bridge in Catawba County, North Carolina).

 

History

 

The bridge was built by 1911 by J. J. Welch at a cost of $40. It is a one-lane bridge, 51 feet in length. The bridge eventually became obsolete as the number of cars increased and it could not handle the increased traffic. It was eventually replaced by a bypass in the 1950s, but it remains a tourist attraction. The bridge is currently to the south of Pisgah Covered Bridge Road, just west of the community of Pisgah. The road now crosses a 2-lane concrete bridge nearby, built in the 1950s.

 

 

Preservation

 

Since 1998, the North Carolina Zoo Society has collaborated with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, the Piedmont Land Conservancy, and the LandTrust for Central North Carolina to maintain and refurbish the bridge. The bridge was washed away by a flood on August 9, 2003, but was rebuilt the next year. The restoration was able to salvage about 90 percent of the materials from the original structure. The bridge is assumed originally to have had a shingle roof; however, it was replaced with tin in the 1930s. In restoration, the roof was returned to shingle.

 

There is now a gate on the road leading to the bridge, which was a response to repeated vandalism. The remote location of the bridge and easy parking at night made vandalism easy and anonymous, but the new gate has significantly reduced the problem.

 

 

Sightseeing

 

This bridge is a perfect place for a picnic or a walk through the woods. There is a quarter mile trail through the woods on site. The trail crosses footbridges, and passes the Pisgah baptismal pool, downstream from the bridge.


- Source: Wikipedia

For more information visit: 
 http://www.heartofnorthcarolina.com/things-to-do/index.pl?id=11

 

History of Trinity, NC and Trinity College (Duke University)

The first settlers in the northwest corner of Randolph County arrived between 1763-1776, settling in what was called the Granville District.  The land offices in the Granville District had been closed following the death of the English landowner, John Carteret, Baron Carteret of Hawnes, the second Earl Granville. When independence was declared in 1776, the Granville District was confiscated by the new government, along with all other land owned by persons loyal to the Crown.  All the land became public lands   and soon thereafter the State of North Carolina was issuing grants for tracts in the former Granville District.  Hundreds of former squatters became landowners at last, purchasing the land where they may have lived for several years.  The 1779 tax records of Randolph County list 25 families for the Trinity Township.

 

The Town of Trinity, named after Trinity College, was incorporated by Act of the North Carolina General Assembly at its 1868-69 Session.  The act, published in Private Laws of the State of North Carolina, Passed by the General Assembly at its Session 1868-’69 states that “The Town shall be two miles long from north to south, and one mile wide from east to west, the center of the Town to be the center of the principal College Building.”  Further sections of the act provided for election of a town magistrate and five commissioners.  The town charter was ratified April 12, 1869, but the charter was rescinded in 1924. In this time frame everything in the community came to be measured from the college.  Thus, the college was the official as well as the unofficial centerpiece of the town.   In 1997 the city was re-incorporated

 

A Town Influenced by Education

 

The first schoolhouses in the area were built by individuals for their own children and possibly for neighboring children. Then, as parents became more conscious about their children's education, schools were built for larger groups of children. One private school in the Trinity area established before 1835 was Brown's Schoolhouse. The first school master is un-known.  However, at some time between 1830-1838, one of the masters at Brown’s Schoolhouse was Allen M. Frazier, a pioneer Quaker.  Mr. Frazier finally resigned his position and built another school house about three-quarters of a mile south of the first one, and was known as “Frazier’s School House.”  It operated for more than fifty years at an un-known location on present day Turnpike Road.   After Mr. Frazier left, Brantley York became the teacher in 1838. During the summer of 1838, Mr. York and the patrons of Brown’s School House erected a new school.  Although this new schoolhouse was larger than the old one, it soon became insufficient to accommodate the increasing enrollment.  Mr. York experienced difficulty in teaching sixty nine (69) pupils in a single room.   Mr. York determined to attempt to establish a permanent institute of learning based upon an Education Association. In February 1839 the people of Brown’s Schoolhouse met to organize a society for the support of an academy. During the meeting York was asked to suggest a name for the new institution, he suggested Union Institute.  This name continued until changed to Normal College in 1851.  

 

In 1841, the State of North Carolina issued a charter for Union Institute, turning it into an academy.  From the days of Brantley York, the Academy was a boarding school. There were no dormitories, the students roomed and boarded in the homes of the people of the neighborhood.

 

The school was re-chartered in 1851 by the Legislature of the State of North Carolina as Normal College, and its graduates were licensed to teach in the public schools of the state. In 1859, the name of the institution is changed to Trinity College upon affiliation with the Methodist Church.  Trinity College relocated to Durham, N.C. in 1892 and became Duke University. 

 

The community was centered on Trinity High School, Trinity College's preparatory school which had moved into the old college building, by 1897. It operated as a department of Trinity College, continuing in the old college building from 1892-1908.  Some teachers had stayed to teach at the high school and some had followed the college to Durham.

 

In 1908 Trinity High School was reorganized under the laws of North Carolina as a First Class High School.  The buildings used were those formerly occupied by Trinity College.  The property had recently undergone extensive repairs.  It was secured by a lease and would be devoted entirely to the work of the school until the county could erect its own buildings.  The school was supported by funds derived in part from local taxation, from county and state funds.  Pupils coming from Trinity, New Market, Back Creek, Tabernacle and Randleman Townships could attend, under the laws of the state and the rulings of the County Board of Education at no tuition charge.  In 1909 the Randolph County Board of Education started leasing the buildings and purchased them in 1919. In 1924 the original college building was demolished. A new building was built on the site, using the columns from the old college in the auditorium of the new school.  This building served until 1968 when a new high school was built nearby.

 

The old high school then became Trinity Junior High School which later became Archdale Trinity Middle School.  The building was destroyed 1981. The columns in the auditorium were used to make a gazebo in front of Braxton Craven School containing the bell from Trinity College's chapel.

- Source: City of Trinity
http://www.trinity-nc.gov/index.asp?Type=NONE&SEC={C38B6910-9FD7-48C3-9DE7-2B8B18AE8754}