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Rowan County

Cities and Towns in 
Rowan  
County

Click on the towns below to visit their websites

Rowan County Political Parties

Democrat

Republican

Libertarian

Schools

Catawba College

Livingstone College


Rowan Cabarrus Community College


Public Schools K - 12

North Rowan High School

Rowan County Early College

West Rowan High School

South Rowan High School


Jesse Carson High School

East Rowan High School

Salisbury High School

Henderson Independent High School

 

C.C Erwin Middle School

West Rowan Middle School

North Rowan Middle School

China Grove Middle School

Corrier Lipe Middle School  

Knox Middle School

Southeast Middle School

 

Woodleaf Elementary School

Rockwell Elementary School

Morgan Elementary School

 

  

Millbridge Elementary School

Mount Ulla Elementary School 

Cleveland Elementary School

Elizabeth Hanford-Dole Elementary School 

North Rowan Elementary School

China Grove Elementary School

Enochville Elementary School


Bostian Elementary School

Shive Elementary School

Faith Elementary School

Granite Quarry Elementary School

Hurley Elementary School

Isenberg Elementary School

Knollwood Elementary School

Koontz Elementary School

Landis Elementary School

Overton Elementary School

 

Private schools

 

Rockwell Christian School
  

Salisbury Academy

Salisbury Adventist School

Cannon School

Sacred Heart Catholic School 

North Hills Christian School 

 

  

Churches

Antioch Church  

High Rock

 

Back Creek Church  

Cleveland

 

Bethel Church  

Salisbury

 

Bethel Church  

Salisbury

 

Calvary Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Calvary Church  

Salisbury

 

Calvary Lutheran Church  

Salisbury

 

Canaan Church  

Rockwell

 

Central United Methodist Church  

Salisbury

 

Christ Lutheran Church  

Salisbury

 

Church of Christ  

Salisbury

 

Church of Christ  

Salisbury

 

Church of the Sacred Heart  

Salisbury

 

Coburn Memorial Methodist Church  

Salisbury

 

Concordia Church  

Enochville

 

Concorice Church  

Rockwell

 

Dorsett Chapel  

Salisbury

 

Dunn Mountain Church  

Salisbury

 

East Corinth Church  

Gold Hill

 

East Spencer Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

Eastside Church  

Rockwell

 

Ebenezer Church  

China Grove

 

Ebenezer Church  

Cleveland

 

Emmanuel Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

Emmanuel Church  

Rockwell

 

Enon Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Erwins Temple  

Cooleemee

 

First Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

First Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

First Calvary Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

First Methodist Church  

Salisbury

 

First Pilgrim Church  

Salisbury

 

First Presbyterian Church  

Salisbury

 

First United Church of Christ  

Salisbury

 

Flat Creek Church  

High Rock

 

Four Square Church  

Rockwell

 

Four Square Gospel Church  

Salisbury

 

Franklin Mission  

Salisbury

 

Friendship Church  

China Grove

 

Full Gospel Church  

Enochville

 

Gays Chapel   

Rowan Mills

 

Gethsemane Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

Gold Hill Church  

Gold Hill

 

Gospel Light Church  

Enochville

 

Gospel Light Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Grace Church  China

Grove

 

Grace-Lower Stone Church  

Rockwell

 

Grays Chapel

Salisbury

 

Halls Chapel  

Salisbury

 

Haven Evangelical Lutheran Church  

Salisbury

 

Henderson Grove Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Immanuel Church  

China Grove

 

Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses  

Salisbury

 

Knox Chapel  

Cleveland

 

Knox Grove Church  

Cool Springs

 

Lebanon Church  

Cleveland

 

Lilys Chapel Holiness Church  

Salisbury

 

Long Street Methodist Episcopal Church  

Salisbury

 

Luthers Church  

High Rock

 

Lyerly Church  

Rockwell

 

Macedonia Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Main Street Church  

Salisbury

 

Maupin Avenue Presbyterian Church  

Salisbury

 

Messiah Lutheran Church  

Salisbury

 

Millers Chapel   

Rowan Mills

 

Moores Chapel  

Cool Springs

 

Mount Calvary Church  

Salisbury

 

Mount Hope Church  

China Grove

 

Mount Moriah Church  

China Grove

 

Mount Tabor Church  

Salisbury

 

Mount Vernon Church  

Cooleemee

 

Mount Zion Church  

China Grove

 

Mount Zion Church  

Salisbury

 

Mount Zion Church  

Cleveland

 

New Hope Zion Church  

Salisbury

 

New Jerusalem Church  

Cool Springs

 

New Zion Church  

Salisbury

 

North Main Street Baptist

Church  Salisbury

 

Oak Grove Church  

Enochville

 

Oak Grove Church  

China Grove

 

Oak Grove Church  

Enochville

 

Oakdale Church  

Salisbury

 

Oakland Heights Chapel  

Salisbury

 

Organ Church  

Rockwell

 

Our Lady of Victories Mission  

Salisbury

 

Park Avenue Methodist Church  

Salisbury

 

Phaniels Church  

China Grove

 

Pilgrim Church  

Gold Hill

 

Pine Ridge Church  

China Grove

 

Prince of Peace Church  

China Grove

 

Prospect Church  

Enochville

 

Providence Church  

Southmont

 

Providence Church  

Cool Springs

 

Rock Grove Church  

Rockwell

 

Rogers Park Church  

China Grove

 

Saint Andrews Church  

Cooleemee

 

Saint Enochs Church  

Enochville

 

Saint Johns Chapel  

Salisbury

 

Saint Johns Lutheran Church  

Salisbury

 

Saint Johns Lutheran Church

Salisbury

 

Saint Lukes Church  

Rockwell

 

Saint Lukes Church  

Cleveland

 

Saint Lukes Church  

Salisbury

 

Saint Lukes Episcopal Church  

Salisbury

 

Saint Marks Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Saint Matthews Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Saint Matthews Church

Gold Hill

 

Saint Paul Church  

Gold Hill

 

Saint Pauls Church  

Enochville

 

Saint Pauls Church  

Rockwell

 

Saint Pauls Episcopal Church  

Salisbury

 

Saint Peters Church  

Gold Hill

 

Saint Peters Episcopal Church  

Salisbury

 

Saint Phillips Church  

Salisbury

 

Salem Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Second Creek Church   

Rowan Mills

 

Second Presbyterian Church  

Salisbury

 

Shady Grove Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

Sharp Church  

Southmont

 

Shiloh Church  

Rockwell

 

Sills Church  

Enochville

 

Smiths Chapel  

Shepherds

 

Soldiers Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church  

Salisbury

 

South River Church  

Cool Springs

 

Southern City Tabernacle African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church  

Salisbury

 

Southside Church  

Salisbury

 

Spencer Methodist Protestant Church  

Salisbury

 

Spencer Presbyterian Church  

Salisbury

 

Stallings Memorial Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

Tabernacle Church  

China Grove

 

Third Creek Church  

Cool Springs

 

Thyatira Church  

Cleveland

 

Trading Ford Church  

Southmont

 

Trinity United Presbyterian Church  

Salisbury

 

Union Church  

Salisbury

 

United House of Prayer  

Salisbury

 

University Church  

Enochville

 

University Church  

Cooleemee

 

Victory Church  

China Grove

 

Wesleyan Church  

Salisbury

 

Wesleyan Church  

Salisbury

 

West A Street Church  

Enochville

 

West Corinth Church  

Enochville

 

West Park Church  

Rockwell

 

White Rock Church  

Rockwell

 

Wyatts Grove Church  

Gold Hill

 

Yadkin Church

Southmont

 

Zion Baptist Church  

Salisbury

 

Zion Church  

Gold Hill

 

Zion Church  

China Grove

 

Zion Church  

Salisbury

 


History of Rowan

The County Seat was first called Rowan Court House. It has been called Salisbury since about 1755.


 

 

 

 

Postcard dated around 1918 of the Rowan County Courthouse

 

Rowan County was formed in 1753 from Anson County, and was named for Matthew Rowan (d. 1760), acting governor at the time the county was formed. The county seat is Salisbury. Initially, Rowan County included the entire northwestern sector of North Carolina, with no clear western boundary, but its size was reduced as a number of counties were split off.

The first big excision was to create Surry County in 1771. Burke and Wilkes counties were formed from the western parts of Rowan and Surry in 1777 and 1778, respectively, leaving a smaller Rowan County that comprised present-day Rowan, Iredell (formed 1788), Davidson (1822), and Davie (1836). Surry, Burke, and Wilkes subsequently fragmented further as well. Depending on where your ancestors lived, you may want to look at records for some of these later counties also. Records of very early land grants in the Rowan County area will be found with Anson County.


A Colonial History of Rowan County, North Carolina, by Samuel Ervin, Jr., published by the University of North Carolina, 1917, Edwards & Broughton Printing Company, Raleigh, North Carolina

 

CHAPTER 1. Description of Rowan County.
CHAPTER II. The Settlements and Boundaries of Rowan County.
CHAPTER III. Colonial Salisbury.
CHAPTER IV. Relations with the Indians.
CHAPTER V. The Courts and Officials of Rowan County and Salisbury District.
CHAPTER VI. The Regulators.
CHAPTER VII. The Churches of Early Rowan.
CHAPTER VIII. Education in Rowan.
CHAPTER IX. The Safety Committee.
CHAPTER X. Social and Industrial Conditions.A COLONIAL HISTORY OF
ROWAN COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

CHAPTER I

DESCRIPTION OF ROWAN COUNTY

The heirs of the eight nobleman to whom Charles II had granted Carolina
in 1663 found that vast territory an unprofitable and unruly charge. In
1728, therefore, the owners of seven of the eight equal undivided shares
offered to sell all their interest in Carolina to the Crown, and the
proposition was accepted. In the following year the purchase was
completed, the seven proprietors who surrendered their claims receiving
17,500 pounds sterling, and the relinquishment of the lands being
confirmed by an act of Parliament. John, Lord Carteret, afterwards
created Earl Granville, alone of the eight lords retained his share.1
In 1744, his part of Carolina was set off for him by grant from George
II, all the territory lying between the Virginia line on the north and the
parallel of 35ø 34' on the south being allotted to him. The eastern
boundary of this immense tract was the Atlantic Ocean and the western, the
Mississippi River.2 At this time the portion of this grant west of the
present eastern boundaries of Randolph, Guilford, and Rockingham counties
was just being entered by enterprising settlers. It is with the region
west of the above-mentioned boundary lines that this sketch is to deal.
This region embraced the northern part of two of the three great natural
divisions of North Carolina Piedmont section and the Mountain section.
The part included in the Piedmont is blessed by nature with countless
streams and an endless succession of hills and valleys which increase as
one goes westward. Its climate is invigorating and wholesome. The soil is
very fertile, especially along the banks of the rivers and creeks. The
earth contains great mineral wealth in the form of coal, iron, gold, and
other metals, ores, and min-

1 Ashe, 217; Williamson, 26-27.
2 Col. Rec. IV, x.6 James SPRUNT Historical Publications

erals. Among the trees found in the forests are the white oak, the white
hickory, the white ash, the elm, the maple, the beech, the poplar, the
persimmon, the black walnut, the yellow pine, and the mulberry. Most of
what has been said of the Piedmont district is also applicable to the
Mountain division. The Blue-Ridge Mountains a portion of the Appalachian
Range lie partly within its borders. Here the wild cherry, the white
pine, the hemlock, the black birch, the white walnut, the chestnut, the
beech, the locust, and many other trees grow. The mineral resources of
this section arc more abundant than those of the Piedmont. The Mountain
region is above all else a land of health and beauty.3 The earliest
visitor to this territory who recorded anything was John Lawson, the
Surveyor-General of the Province of North Carolina. In December, 1700,
accompanied by several other Englishmen and Indian guides, he left
Charleston for an exploration of the northern province.4

His tour extended as far west as the section later erected into Rowan County. The land embracing the southern part of the county as it now stands and the counties to the south he described as "Pleasant savanna ground, high and dry, having very few trees upon it, and those standing at a great
distance. The land was very good and free from grubs or underwood. A man
near Sapona (the Yadkin) may more easily clear ten acres of ground than
in some places he can one; there being much loose stone upon the land,
lying very convenient for making of dry walls or any other sort of durable
fence. The country abounds likewise with curious, bold creeks, navigable
for small craft, disgorging themselves into the main rivers that vent
them- selves into the ocean. These creeks are well stored with sundry
sorts of fish and fowl, and are very convenient for the transportation of
what commodities this place may produce."5 Lawson continued his journey a
few miles further north, passing through a country which he characterized
as "a delicious country; none that I ever saw exceeds it." Fine bladed
grass, six feet high, grew along the creeks, and the sepulchres of dead
In-

3 Hand-book of N. C., 22-46.
4 Lawson, 19.
5 Lawson, 80. A Colonial History of Rowan County 7

dians were seen. Lawson found the town of the Sapona Indians located in.
an open field about a mile square on the fertile and pleasant banks of the
Sapona River, as the Yadkin was then called.6 This town was near Trading
Ford, a few miles east of the site of the present city of Salisbury.
Trading Ford was so called because it was on the ancient Trading Path
which traders from Virginia traveled at an early date in going to the
Catawbas and other southern Indians.7 Lawson was delighted with the scenes around the Yadkin. He says: "This most pleasant river may be something broader than the Thames at Kingston, keeping a continual warbling noise, with its reverberating on the bright marble rocks. . . . One side of the river is hemmed in with mountainy ground, the other side proving as rich a soil as any this western world can afford.8 A numerous train of
swan and other water fowl were on the stream and many small birds sang upon its banks.9 The travelers were entertained by the old king of the
Saponas, who proved very friendly to the white men. Neighboring tribes of
Indians were the Toteros, who inhabited the "westward mountains," and the
Keyauwees, who dwelt in a village about forty miles west of Trading Ford.
These three nations were small, and at that time were planning to combine
in order to strengthen themselves and become formidable to their enemies.
About ten days before Lawson's arrival among them the Saponas captured
five northern Indians. Indians from the north ranged over the country
and were a terror to the less warlike tribes of the south. The Saponas
were preparing to put. the captives to death with cruel torture, but
released them upon the request of the Toteros, some of whom, when taken
prisoners by the northern Indians a short time before, had been kindly
treated and permitted to return to their own people.10 The old king of
the Saponas took much pride in several horses which he owned. Lawson was
highly pleased with the country. Every step, he declared, presented some
new object to his view.

6 Lawson, 81.
7 Rumple, 15.
8 Lawson, 81,
9 Lawson, 83.
10 Lawson, 82-84.8 James Sprunt Historical Publications

Beavers, swan, geese, and deer were plentiful in the neighborhood of the
Yadkin. During the stay of the explorers at Sapona town a party of the
Toteros, "tall, likely men," came down from the west "having great plenty
of buffaloes, elks, and bears with other sort of deer amongst them." One
of the Indian doctors acquainted Lawson with a large quantity of
medicines that were produced in those parts.11 After remaining several
days at Sapona Lawson's party made a two days trip to the westward.
The country became more mountainous and many streams were crossed. At a
distance of some thirty or forty miles west of the Yadkin they reached the
town of the Keyauwees, situated five miles northwest of a rocky river
called the Heighwaree. Near the town was another stream. The land was
"more mountainous, but extremely pleasant and an excellent place for the
breeding (of) sheep, goats, and horses or mules," The valleys were very
fertile. The village of the Keyauwees was encircled by high mountains, and
large cornfields adjoined the cabins of the savages. No grass grew upon
the high cliffs and the growth of trees upon them was sparse. The earth
in this region was of a reddish color, which Lawson said signfied (sic)
the presence of minerals. The Keyauwees received the travelers with
hospitality, Lawson lodged at the house of Keyauwees Jack, a Congaree
Indian, who had obtained the chieftainship through marriage with the
queen, for among the Indians descent was counted on the female side. The
Keyauwees were unique in that most of them wore mustaches or whiskers a
habit rarely practiced by Indians.l2 Two or three days were spent with
the Keyauwees. Most of the members of Lawson's party desired to go
straightway to Virginia, but he was determined to continue his course to
the coast of North Carolina. He and one companion, therefore, bade
farewell to the rest of the group. On the third day's journey, after
passing over many waters and through rich lands, they reached the Haw
River, whence they made their way to the coast of the province.13 Lawson
did not penetrate the wilderness as far westward as the Catawba nation.
Nor did he learn anything of the powerful

11 Lawson, 84-85.
12 Lawson, 67-91.
13 Lawson, 92-105. A Colonial History of Rowan County 9

Cherokees who lived beyond the mountains and who at a future date were to
make incursions into the settlements, bringing devastation and destruction
with them. The Saponas, Keyauwees, and Toteros combined with several
small tribes and removed to Virginia soon after Lawson's departure. After
dwelling in Virginia, a few miles north of the Roanoke, for twenty-five years,
they returned to Carolina and lived with the Catawbas.l4

 Read More


More Infromation

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 130,340 people, 49,940 households, and 35,507 families residing in the county. The population density was 255 people per square mile (98/km²). There were 53,980 housing units at an average density of 106 per square mile (41/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 80.02% White, 15.78% Black or African American, 0.33% Native American, 0.85% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.00% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. 4.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 49,940 households out of which 32.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.80% were married couples living together, 11.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.90% were non-families. 24.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.70% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 29.80% from 25 to 44, 22.50% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,494, and the median income for a family was $44,242. Males had a median income of $31,626 versus $23,437 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,071. About 8.10% of families and 10.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.70% of those under age 18 and 11.40% of those age 65 or over.

- Source: Wikipedia

Catawba College



CATAWBA
COLLEGE
: A Strength of Tradition

The vitality of Catawba College lies in its tradition of strong academic programs; sensitive, concerned but demanding faculty; diverse students who share a seriousness of purpose; successful, loyal graduates and informed, committed trustees.

 

 

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BUILDING THE TRADITION: History of Catawba College Catawba's tradition extends back to its establishment in 1851 in the town of Newton, a center of commerce in the foothills of western North Carolina. This region had been settled by hardy German pioneers who had traveled in the 1740s from eastern Pennsylvania to settle in the valleys of the Haw, Yadkin, and Catawba rivers. Bringing with them a strong cultural and religious heritage, these pious settlers established the North Carolina Classis of the Reformed Church in 1831 and shortly thereafter in 1834 established an Education Society to send young men to certain northern schools of the Reformed Church so that they might be educated and return to serve in the ministry.

 

This tradition of placing a high value on education made itself felt again in the meeting of the Classis at St. Matthew's Arbor in 1848 where it was suggested that the Education Society "found a college of our own in our own midst." Bearing the name of the Indian tribe which had already lent its name to the county and the river flowing nearby, Catawba College opened in 1851 with a gift of ten acres of land and a capital investment of $15,000. The years that followed were filled with a fair level of prosperity for the growing institution, reflecting the economic climate of the area. The Civil War, however, brought drastic changes, reducing the availability of funds and students. During the war years, the College became an academy, operating as Catawba High School from 1865 to 1885. In the latter year, it resumed operations under its original charter as Catawba College.

 

In 1890, Catawba became a coeducational institution, with the first woman graduate completing her studies in 1893. Even with the addition of women to the student body, the College struggled to overcome the ravages and depletion brought on by the war. Responding to the offer of a partially constructed dormitory-administration building and several acres of land in Salisbury, trustee, college, and church officials closed the campus in Newton in 1923 and re-opened in Salisbury in 1925. In 1957, the Evangelical and Reformed Church, Catawba's parent body, merged with the Congregational Christian Churches to form the United Church of Christ, with which the College maintains affiliation. There are, however, no sectarian restrictions at the College; instead, the institution seeks to maintain an atmosphere congenial to all students in search of truth. Many different religious denominations are represented among the student body with Baptist, Methodist, Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Presbyterian, the United Church of Christ, and the Episcopal churches having the largest number of students enrolled.

 

Catawba seeks to serve the Salisbury-Rowan County community through its programs and services. The Robertson College-Community Center, a facility built as a joint venture with the community over 37 years ago, houses the Shuford School of Performing Arts and showcases musical and theatre productions from the college and the community. Similarly, the college's athletic facilities have been enhanced by the local community and are available to local residents as well as students. Students thus have an opportunity to be an active part of a larger community while they are enrolled at Catawba and find within that community opportunities for interaction, service, and personal development.

 

Since Catawba opened its doors in the Salisbury community in 1925, it has built a tradition of successful graduates who continue to honor the College by their achievements and enable it through their support to strengthen that tradition with each entering class. These graduates include physicians, attorneys, teachers and college professors, corporate executives, actors and musicians, social workers, and others who contribute to our society in a variety of ways.

 

 

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CATAWBA COLLEGE TODAY Catawba College now has 35 buildings on 276 wooded acres. It is known for its 189-acre on-campus ecological preserve and its 300-acre wildlife refuge. The physical plant is valued in excess of $30 million. Over 1,000 students representing many different U.S. states and foreign countries attend Catawba. The student body is evenly divided among men and women.

 

Like the student body, the Catawba faculty is cosmopolitan in nature. It embodies a significant range of opinion and philosophy, founded in studies at many of our nation's leading colleges and universities. Of the 78 full-time teaching faculty, over 70 percent hold the doctorate or terminal degree in their discipline (Ph.D. or M.F.A.).

 

Catawba seeks to employ faculty members who not only are excellent teachers, but who also have the capacity to guide and challenge students through their interaction with them in clubs, scholastic organizations, and athletic and social activities. Faculty are genuinely committed to the mission of the College which expresses concern for the total development of the student. The ideal faculty-student ratio means that a faculty member is always available to aid and counsel a student and to offer support in the sometimes difficult developmental process. Former students often attribute their success to the fact that faculty members cared about them as persons, not just for their academic performance. Catawba College is governed by a Board of Trustees of almost 50 men and women representing a broad spectrum of leadership from various constituency groups within the College community — businesses and professions, the alumni association, and the United Church of Christ.

http://www.catawba.edu/

The following articles on historical and outdoor attractions in Rowan County are courtesy:
 
Rowan County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Please visit the Rowan CVB's website for much more area information - it is one of the best tourism sites in NC!


www.visitsalisburync.com

African American Heritage Trail


Address: The Gateway Building 204 E. Innes, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-638-3100
Toll-Free: 800-332-2343
Description: This self-guided tour chronicles the historic moments, great leaders and lives of generations of African-Americans who lived, worked and contributed to the industrial, artistic, cultural and spiritual life of the Salisbury community.

Edith M. Clark History/Genealogy Room-Rowan Public Library



Address: PO Box 4039 201 Fisher Street, Salisbury, NC 28145
Phone: 704-216-8232
Fax: 704-638-3013
Description: The Edith M. Clark History Room of the Rowan Public Library is a valuable resource for family historians whose ancestors came from the Southern and Middle Atlantic colonies. The collection focuses on all of North Carolina with significant holdings from bordering states and those showing heavy migration in and out of the Piedmont. Resources are also available for those interested in local history. Mon.- Thur. 9 am - 9 pm, Fri. and Sat. 9 am - 5 pm, Sun. (Sept-May) 1-5 pm.

Historic Downtown Salisbury

Address: Corner of N. Main and E. Liberty Streets, Salisbury, NC 28145
Phone: 704-638-9887
Description: The 30-square-block area which includes the Dr. Josephus Hall House, built in 1820 as the Salisbury Female Academy, and the Utzman-Chambers House, an 1819 Federal townhouse. A guided audio walking tour is available for rent at the Rowan County Convention & Visitors Bureau that covers this historic district and much of the downtown area.

Historic National Cemetery and Confederate Prison Site



Address: 202 Government Road, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-638-3100
Toll-Free: 800-332-2343
Fax: 704-642-2011
Description:
Dedicated in 1874, this is the final resting place for veterans of all wars. Buried in 18 trench graves are 11,700 Union soldiers who died at the Salisbury Confederate Prison during the Civil War. Including Medal of Honor recipient, Lorenzo Deming who served on the U.S. Picket Boat No. 1, incarcerated at the Prison at the age of 20. Deming's family was presented the Medal of Honor after his death in 1865 by President Andrew Johnson
Office open 8 am - 4:30 pm Monday - Friday. Grounds are never closed. This self-guided driving tour is a must for Civil War buffs. Although nothing remains of the Salisbury Prison, the tour poignantly provides insights into this period of our history. Three monuments erected by the State of Maine, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the U.S. Government stand in the Salisbury National Cemetery as a tribute to the Union soldiers who died while at the prison. CDs of the driving tour are available at a charge of $5 at the Visitor Information Center in the Gateway Building located at 204 E. Innes Street

Historic Rockwell Museum

Address: 102 East Main Street, Rockwell, NC 28138
Phone: 704-279-5783
Description: Historic Rockwell Museum displays a representation of late 19th and early 20th century area artifacts. New exhibits are displayed each spring and fall with a festival of trees at Christmas time.


Historic Salisbury Foundation



Address: 215 Depot Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-636-0103
Description: Historic Salisbury Foundation, Inc. is a private nonprofit preservation organization that offers a broad range of services to the Salisbury community. Founded in 1972, the Foundation is in its fourth decade of active participation in planning for the future of Salisbury's special past. The Foundation sponsors the Josephus Hall House Museum, OctoberTour of Homes and several other yearly events. The Foundation is housed in the beautiful Salisbury Station at 215 Depot Street. The Salisbury Station  is available for your special event or meeting and information on rental can be found on the Historic Salisbury Foundation website.

Historic Salisbury Trolley Tours

Address: 204 E Innes Street, Suite 120, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-638-3100
Toll-Free: 800-332-2343
Fax: 704-642-2011
Description: What better way to experience 250 years of Salisbury heritage and the continuum of architectural styles in our historic districts than on a Trolley tour? Tours are available on Saturdays at 11 am and 1 pm April 5 through October 25. These narrated tours feature experienced guides who will give you an "up close and personal" glimpse into Salisbury's preservation efforts and the famous and infamous personalities that make Salisbury "where the past is still present." Call for ticket information. Rowan County Convention & Visitors Bureau, 204 E Innes St., Salisbury.

Josephus Hall House



Address: 226 S. Jackson Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-636-0103
Description: This impressive house museum was once home to Dr. Josephus Hall, Chief Surgeon at the Salisbury Confederate Prison during the Civil War. Built in 1820 in the Federal style, additions in 1859 and in 1900 have given the house Greek Revival and Victorian features. The interior boasts painted ceilings, original fixtures, and an impressive collection of mid-Victorian furnishings and decorative accessories belonging to the Hall family. Docents in period costume conduct guided tours. Hours: Saturdays and Sundays 1:00 pm until 4:00 pm. Group tours can be scheduled during the week by appointment.

Livingstone College



Address: 701 West Monroe Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-216-6067
Description: Located 1 mile from the downtown area in the Livingstone Historic District, this charming private college campus offers a variety of venues. From Varick Auditorium, seating 1400 and Tubman Theatre, seating 300, to classrooms providing alternative space for up to 100, Livingstone is an ideal choice for meetings and receptions. Sporting facilities also available.
Web Address: www.livingstone.edu


North Carolina Transportation Museum



Address: 411 S. Salisbury Avenue, Spencer, NC 28159
Phone: 704-636-2889
Toll-Free: 877-628-6386
Fax: 704-639-1881
Description: Located on the site of what was once the Southern Railway Company's largest steam locomotive repair facility. Visit antique automobiles at "Bumper to Bumper" and trace the history of transportation in "Wagons, Wheels & Wings." Experience days of the working railroad repair shop in the restored 1924 Robert Julian roundhouse. The museum features thirteen buildings, 57 acres, including a restored roundhouse and exhibits on early transportation. Seasonal train ride (fee), audiovisual show, visitors center and gift shop. Hours of Operation: 9 am to 5 pm Monday - Saturday, 1-5 pm Sundays. Winter Hours (Nov. 1st - April 30th) 9 am - 5 pm, Tuesday-Saturday, 1-5 pm. Sundays. Closed some holidays, call for information. Due to Construction onsite schedule may vary, please call before visiting. Museum is free. Fee for train rides, turntable rides and guided tours. Special annual events include Rail Days, Antique Car and Truck Shows.

Old Stone House


Address:
Old Stone House Road, Granite Quarry, NC 28072
Phone: 704-633-5946
Fax: 704-633-9858
Description: Built by German immigrant Michael Braun in 1766, this two-story Georgian-style house is the oldest structure in Rowan County. The home was stately for its time, with the stones on the front carefully shaped and matched, creating an impressive face to visitors. Open Saturday and Sunday 1 pm until 4 pm.

Piedmont Players & Meroney Theatre

Address: 213 S Main Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-633-5471
Description: The historic Meroney Theater, home of the Piedmont Players Theatre, is a renovated 361 seat theater, built in 1906, in Salisbury, North Carolina. The Meroney's illustrious stage has been graced by Sarah Bernhardt, Lillian Russell, John Philip Sousa, William Howard Taft, Cary Nation, and the New York Symphony Orchestra. We have grown accustomed to our new home and it is even better than we expected. Most of all, we are gratified by the wonderful reception our community has afforded this facility. In our inaugural season, 14,000 patrons of the arts came to downtown Salisbury to enjoy Piedmont Players productions. Our audiences and casts included all ages from primary grade children to senior citizens. Many community-minded citizens have pooled their talents and treasures to make the Meroney Theatre the splendid gift it has become for Salisbury and Rowan County. Thanks to all of you. Come home to the Meroney Theater and come back often.

Rowan Museum



Address: 202 North Main Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-633-5946
Fax: 704-633-9858
Description: This 1854 courthouse, which survived Stoneman's raid, is one of the finest examples of pre-Civil War architecture in the state. Home of the Rowan Museum, reflecting artifacts and displays on the life and history of Rowan County.

Salisbury Civic Center

Address: 315 S Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-638-2139
Description: This 24-acre park site offers a Civic Center, clay tennis courts, walking trails, basketball court, picnic area and play structures. The Civic Center has racquetball courts, fitness center, kitchen facilities, and is available to rent for meetings or other activities. Can host small meetings of 50, banquets and receptions of 288.

Salisbury Confederate Prison Symposium

Address: Rowan County Library 200 W Fisher Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-637-6411
Description: The annual event occurs each year in mid-April. Come join us as we continue to explore the 1861-1865 history of North Carolina's military prison during the War between the States. Lectures will cover a variety of topics relating to the Prison and those who were there. Friday's "Reunion of Descendants and Friends" and "Friendship Banquet" will be held at the Landmark Church Fellowship Hall with keynote address, music, displays, and door prizes. Saturday's six lectures will take place at Catawba College's Tom Smith Auditorium with displays and light refreshments included. Authors will be available to sign books. The two Sunday Memorial Services with flags, music and re-enactors are free to the public. Registration fee is $60 through March 23, 2007 and $70 afterwards.

Salisbury Heritage Walking Tour

Address: The Gateway Building 204 East Innes Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-638-3100
Toll-Free: 800-332-2343
Fax: 704-642-2011
Description: A perfect way to see Historic Salisbury at your own pace. This 2-mile walking tour provides a personal glimpse into the history and architecture of Historic Downtown Salisbury and the stately homes of the West Square District. The brochures and players for the tour are loaned at a fee of $2.00 and can be obtained at the Visitor Information Center in the Gateway Building located at 204 E Innes Street in Salisbury. The Visitor Center is open T-F, 10 am -4 pm, and Sat. 10 am - 4 pm.

Salisbury History & Art Trail



Address: 204 E Innes Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-638-3100
Toll-Free: 800-332-2343
Description: Start your journey at the Rowan County Convention & Visitors Center where you may pick up a brochure and map of the Trail. The Trail features sites, markers, monuments and art relating to significant people and places in local history, culture, industry and the arts. This unique trail falls mainly in historic downtown Salisbury and is a great way to spend an afternoon exploring the town.

Salisbury Station Conference Center



Address: 215 Depot Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-636-0103
Fax: 704-636-2522
Description: Groups of 20 to 300 (cold weather) and 20 to 600 (warm weather) will enjoy meetings, receptions and trade shows held in the elegant ambiance of the restored Depot. The building features a renovated waiting room, with a state-of-the-art sound system, as well as a covered concourse and adjacent meeting rooms for smaller breakout sessions.

Salisbury-Rowan County Convention & Visitors Bureau

Address: 204 East Innes St., Ste. 120, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-638-3100
Toll-Free: 800-332-2343
Fax: 704-642-2011
Description: The Visitor Center offers a variety of self-guided tours to the public. The Salisbury Heritage walking tour provides a personal glimpse into the history and architecture of Historic Downtown Salisbury and the stately homes of the West Square District. The brochures and players for the tour can be rented for a small fee. The African American Heritage Trail self-guided tour chronicles the historic moments, great leaders and lives of generations of African-Americans who lived, worked and contributed to the industrial, artistic, cultural and spiritual life of the Salisbury community. Brochure and map available at no cost. Salisbury Confederate Prison & National Cemetery self-guided driving tour is a must for Civil War buffs. This driving tour is sold on CD for $5 at the Visitor Center. Although nothing remains of the Salisbury Prison, the tour poignantly provides insights into this period of our history. Three monuments erected by the State of Maine, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the U.S. Government stand in the Salisbury National Cemetery as a tribute to the 11,700 brave Union soldiers who died while at the prison.  The Visitor Information Center is located in the Gateway Building at 204 E. Innes Street, Salisbury.

Spencer Historic District

Address: Salisbury Avenue 338 Rowan Avenue, Spencer, NC 28159
Phone: 704-633-2231
Description: Located adjacent to the NC Transportation Museum, the Spencer National Historic Register District is the largest contiguous district in North Carolina. It contains 322 residential and commercial buildings primarily constructed between 1905 and 1920 to provide support and housing for the workers of Southern Railway's former steam locomotive repair facility.

The Salisbury Emporium

Address: 230 East Kerr Street, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-642-0039
Description: The Salisbury Emporium is a collection of 85 shops located in the 100 year old restored Frick Sawmill Supply building in the historic railroad corridor, listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. You will find over 15,000 square feet of gifts, antiques, home accessories, Christmas items, fine art, furniture, pottery, books, jewelry, garden decorations, china, crystal, silver, prints, military relics and much more in a relaxed atmosphere of true Southern hospitality Closed on Mondays.

Utzman-Chambers House


Address: 116 S. Jackson St., Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-633-5946
Fax: 704-633-9858
Description: This 1819 Federal townhouse was built by Jacob Stirewalt, master builder of the period, and reflects the lifestyle of the more affluent citizens of the early 1800s with its unique curved staircase and exquisite interior moldings and details. One of the few surviving Federal period townhouses in Piedmont North Carolina, it features period rooms with Hepplewhite and Chippendale furniture as well as furniture made by Rowan County craftsmen. House and gardens open Thursday - Sunday 1 pm until 4 pm.

Village of Gold Hill



Address: St. Stephen's Church Road, Gold Hill, NC 28071
Phone: 704-267-9439
Fax:
Description: "The richest mining property east of the Mississippi." This was the message sent to England in the mid-1800s after gold was discovered here in 1824. Once a thriving, rough and rowdy mining town in the eastern part of Rowan County, the village is coming to life again with the restoration of area homes and stores. Visit the Rock Jail, Mauney's 1840 Store and Museum, and the E.H. Montgomery Store. Picnic and playground area in the park. Park closes at dark daily. No admission charge. Mauney's and Montgomery's Stores open Wed. - Sat. 10:30 am - 5:30 pm, Sun. 2-5:30 pm.  Call to confirm hours before visiting.

W.J. Walls Heritage Hall

Address: 701 W. Monroe Street Livingstone College, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-216-6094
Description: Located on the campus of Livingstone College, Heritage Hall is a repository of African, African-American, and African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church history, artifacts, literature, books and records. Open Monday - Friday 9 am - 5 pm.
Web Address: www.livingstone.edu

Dunn's Mountain Park

Address: Dunn's Mtn Rd, Salisbury, NC 28146
Description:
With a donation from Friends of the Mountain and a Parks and Recreation Trust Fund Grant and generosity of the Land Trust For Central North Carolina, this property is the newest Rowan County Park.
Days of Operation and Times December, January, February - 1 weekend per month, will advertise when - Saturday 11 to 4 PM and Sunday 12:30 to 4 PM
 
March - 2 weekends per month, will advertise when - Saturday 11 to 6 PM and Sunday 12:30 to 6 PM
 
April and May Friday - Saturday 11 to 7 PM - Sunday 12:30 to 7 PM June, July, August - Wednesday – Saturday 11 to 8 PM - Sunday 12:30 to 8 PM September - Friday – Saturday 11 to 7 PM - Sunday 12:30 to 7 PM October, November - Friday – Saturday 11 to 5 PM - Sunday 12:30 to 5 PM
 
Transportation to the top of mountain is available Saturday and Sunday only during operating hours.

Web Address: www.co.rowan.nc.us

Eagle Point Nature Preserve

Address: 665 Black Road, Salisbury, NC 28147
Phone: 704-636-2089
Toll-Free: 866-767-2757
Description: Two hundred acre natural area on remote part of High Rock Lake. Visitors can hike 4.5 miles of trails to vistas of the lake and wildlife observation points. Self-introspective nature trails, old home sites, seasonal canoe access, and fishing from the shore.

Gold Hill Mines Historic Park

Address: 755 St Stephen's Church Road, Gold Hill, NC 28071
Phone: 704-279-5674
Description: 70 acre historic theme park - the site of Barnhardt and Randolph Gold Mines reportedly the richest mining properties East of the Mississippi. Home of the first gold rush.

High Rock Lake



Address: Bringle Ferry Road, Salisbury, NC 28147
Toll-Free: 800-332-2343
Description: A 15,000-acre reservoir on the Yadkin River featuring excellent boating and fishing opportunities. For information about hunting and fishing regulations and licensing, contact the NC Wildlife Dept. at 919-662-4381. Public boat ramps are located at Smiley's Tamarac Marina (Fee) and at Wildlife Access, by the Second Creek bridge on Bringle Ferry Road.


Hurley Park



Address: Lake Drive, Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-633-8950
Description: Elizabeth Holmes Hurley Park is a 14-acre public park composed of woodlands, streams, gardens and quiet pathways. It includes collections of hollies and magnolias, a wildflower garden, an azalea garden, and many other plantings which provide year-round interest and beauty. Finely crafted benches and tables, specially designed bridges and distinctive gazebos enhance the gardens.

Kelsey Scott Park

Address: 1920 Old Wilkesboro Road, Salisbury, NC 28147
Phone: 704-638-2113
Description: A play structure, picnic shelter with tables and grills, one softball field, 2 basketball courts, and a 9-hole disc golf course make up this 21.7 acre park.
Web Address: www.salisburync.gov

Kerr Mill at Sloan Park



Address: 550 Sloan Road, Mount Ulla, NC 28125
Phone: 704-637-7776
Description: Nestled in the foothills of the Central Piedmont of North Carolina, Sloan Park offers the ideal passive recreational opportunity for families, schools, church groups, and other organizations. With 93 acres of green space, 3 miles of trails, 5 picnic shelters, volleyball and softball fields, playground and gristmill. Special features include the Historic Tree Trail, Don's Gazebo and Stanback Memorial Forest and lovely Kerr Mill, an 1823 grist mill that houses a museum of Early Americana. Open 1 pm until 7 pm Saturday and Sunday. By appointment Monday, Thursday, and Friday.

RiverPark

Address: Erwin Temple Ch Rd, Cooleemee, NC 27014
Description:

RiverPark at Cooleemee Falls features large picnic shelter, canoe portage, hiking trails,

rest room facilities and a beautiful setting for fun and adventure

RiverPark is open 8 a.m. - sunset, 7 days a week

Free to the Public

Remember: if you’re not a Rowan Co. resident you must have a NC license to fish. [Purchase at Cooleemee True Value Hardware Store.]

 

Directions: Located near Cooleemee, NC . From town go South on Hwy 801

over the river bridge into Rowan Co. Turn right (west) on Needmore Road

and right again on Erwin Temple Church Road, drive to end!

Picnic Shelter rentals: $30 per half day.

Call (336) 751-2325


The Kannapolis Intimidators

Address: 2888 Moose Rd., Kannapolis, NC 28083
Phone: 704-932-3267
Description:

The Kannapolis Intimidators are the single A farm club in the Chicago White Sox minor league chain. Young players generally one year out of high school or college usually become Kannapolis Intimidators. The White Sox also have affiliates in Bristol, TN (Rookie), Great Falls, MT (Short Season), Winston-Salem, NC (A-Advanced), Birmingham, AL (AA), and Charlotte, NC (AAA). The 2008 Kannapolis Intimidators finished the season with an overall record of 67-68.

League Membership
The Intimidators are one of the 16 teams of the Class A South Atlantic League. The SAL is currently operating in its 105th year. The circuit is one of the biggest geographically in Minor League Baseball, including eight states spanning from Lakewood, NJ, to Savannah, GA. The Kannapolis Intimidators play in the Northern Division of the South Atlantic League.
 
For a complete schedule of games visit our website.