The North Carolina

 

 

 

Visitor Center

Stanly

Cities and Towns in 
Stanly  
County

Click on the towns below to visit their websites


Albemarle

Aquadale

Badin

Big Lick

Cottonville

Endy

Finger

Frog Pond

Locust 

Millingport

New London 

Norwood

Palestine

Palmerville

Plyler

Oakboro

Porter

Richfield

Stanfield

Tuckertown

Misenheimer

Red Cross

Stanly County Political Parties


Democrat

Republican

Libertarian

Churches

Anderson Grove Church 

Albemarle

 

Annunciation Catholic Church

Albemarle

 

Barbee Church 

Oakboro

 

Bear Creek Church 

Frog Pond

 

Bethany Church 

New London

 

Bethel Church 

New London

 

Bethel Church 

Locust

 

Bethel Church 

Richfield

 

Bethesda Church 

Albemarle

 

Brown Hill Church 

Locust

 

Browns Chapel 

New London

 

Calvary Church 

Albemarle

 

Calvary Church 

Albemarle

 

Canton Church 

Frog Pond

 

Carolina Church 

Locust

 

Cedar Grove Church 

New London

 

Cedar Grove Church 

Aquadale

 

Centerview Church 

New London

 

Community Church 

Locust

 

Coyl Church 

Stanfield

 

Dunns Grove Church 

New London

 

East Albemarle Church 

Albemarle

 

Faith Church 

New London

 

Friendship Church 

Albemarle

 

Friendship Church 

Stanfield

 

Full Gospel Church 

Albemarle

 

Green Memorial Church 

Aquadale

 

Hatley Grove Church 

Oakboro

 

Herrins Grove Church 

Locust

 

Highland Church 

New London

 

Hillside Church 

Albemarle

 

Howards Chapel 

Aquadale

 

Indian Hill Church 

Stanfield

 

Kendalls Church 

New London

 

Kinza Memorial Church 

Stanfield

 

Lakeview Church 

Albemarle

 

Liberty Hill Church 

Frog Pond

 

Loves Chapel 

Stanfield

 

Loves Grove Church 

Stanfield

 

Mattons Grove Church 

Richfield

 

Meadow Creek Church 

Locust

 

Mineral Springs Church 

Oakboro

 

Mission Church 

Locust

 

Morgans Memorial Church 

Stanfield

 

Mount Olive Church 

Albemarle

 

Mount Tabor Church 

Richfield

 

Mount Zion Church 

Aquadale

 

Mount Zion Church 

Albemarle

 

Mountain Creek Church 

New London

 

Mountain View Creek Church 

New London

 

New Bethel Church 

Richfield

 

New Hope Church 

New London

 

New Hope Church 

Albemarle

 

New Life Church 

Frog Pond

 

New Mountain Creek Church 

New London

 

Oak Grove Church 

Locust

 

Opendoor Church 

New London

 

Parkers Grove Church 

New London

 

Parkers Memorial Church 

New London

 

Parkway Church 

Albemarle

 

Philadelphia Church 

Stanfield

 

Pine Grove Church 

Albemarle

 

Pleasant Grove Church 

Frog Pond

 

Poplins Grove Church 

Albemarle

 

Prospect Church 

New London

 

Providence Church 

Locust

 

Randell Church 

Morrow Mountain

 

Rehobeth Church 

Aquadale

 

Ridgecrest Church 

Frog Pond

 

Rocky Hill Church 

Morrow Mountain

 

Running Creek Church 

Frog Pond

 

Saint Martins Church 

Frog Pond

 

Salem Church 

Richfield

 

Shankel Grove Church 

Mount Gilead West

 

Shiloh Church 

Morrow Mountain

 

Silver Spring Church 

Albemarle

 

Smith Grove Church 

Oakboro

 

South  Church 

Aquadale

 

Stony Hill Church 

Morrow Mountain

 

Sweet Home Church 

Albemarle

 

Sweet Home Church 

New London

 

Tabernacle Church 

New London

 

Union Chapel 

Albemarle

 

Union Grove Church 

Albemarle

 

Wesley Chapel 

Richfield

 

West Oakboro Church 

Oakboro

 

Note on Churches:  North Carolina is blessed to boast hundreds of churches in every county.  We make every effort to list each church in each county.  If your church is not listed in our directory, please let us know.

Letter to the Editor

 

Dear Friends,   what a great idea your Visitor Center and newsletter is.  Though I live in Albemarle (not quite in Sandhills),  I have "grown up" in the Uwharries,  golf courses of Moore County, attended school at St. Andrews Presbyterian College, and have countless ties to this area.  I would welcome your newsletter to continue to be informed about events and places.  Thanks for everything you are doing to promote this great part of our state.  

 

Banks Garrison,  Albemarle.     

 

 

__________________

History of Stanly County

Stanly was formed in 1841 from Montgomery County. It was named in honor of John Stanly who for many years was a member of the Legislature and several times speaker of the House of Commons. It is in the central section of the state and is bounded by Montgomery, Richmond, Anson, Union, Cabarrus, and Rowan counties. The present land area is 395.06 square miles and the 2000 population was 58,100. Albemarle is the county seat. 


On January 11, 1841, a new county was founded in North Carolina’s Piedmont region – Stanly County. Created out of the western portion of Montgomery County, Stanly County’s eastern borders were determined by the Yadkin and Pee Dee Rivers. The names of Stanly County’s first Justices of the Peace remain prominent among Stanly County citizens today –William Swaringen, chairman, Edmund Lilly, Eldridge Parker, Henry Davis, Joshua Hearne, Jacob Austin, Richmond Snuggs, James Allen, John Stone, Francis Kron, John Miller, Daniel Palmer, Thomas Rowland, Mathias Moose, and John Furr. The county court elected D. Hearne, Clerk of Court; S.P. Morton, Register of Deeds; and Eben Hearne, High Sheriff. The Hearne family donated fifty-one acres of land to establish Albemarle, the new county seat. The County Commissioners accepted the deeded property, and a section of what had been the great Hearne Plantation became the heart of the new town.

 

As strange as it sounds, the new county was titled after a man who never stepped foot on the soil that bears his name. John Stanly was a notorious and popular personage in nineteenth-century North Carolina. Born in New Bern, Stanly served in the House of Commons, the State Legislature, and the 7th and 11th session of Congress. John Stanly was known as a well-informed theorist, brilliant orator, and cantankerous politician. Stanly was involved in a political dispute with Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., the first native-born governor of North Carolina. Living up to his reputation as a colorful and quick-tempered individual, Stanly challenged Spaight to a duel. Stanly shot and killed Governor Spaight in North Carolina’s last legalized duel; he was pardoned by the succeeding governor eight days later. Despite Stanly’s controversial past, the county was named after John Stanly in order to gain preference and recognition from powerful officials in the eastern region of the state where Stanly was favored.

The area now known as Stanly County has a history that reaches back over 10,000 years, when small tribes of hunter-gatherers migrated with herds into the Piedmont. As far as we know, these people did not farm or establish permanent villages, but rather subsisted by hunting game and gathering naturally growing vegetation. Archaeologists named these early Native Americans after the areas they inhabited; for example, there are the Stanly people, Pee Dee people, Morrow Mountain people, and Badin people.

Other important factors contributed to the identity and establishment of Stanly County, such as the Montgomery County courthouse fire of 1835. The General Assembly of 1841 settled a dispute between officials as to where the new courthouse should stand by dividing Montgomery County in two, thereby creating Stanly County. Each party built a courthouse where they chose. Other notable buildings in Stanly County are the John Randall House, the county’s oldest surviving residence; the Isaiah W. Snuggs House; and the Freeman-Marks House, built by one of Albemarle’s founding merchants, Daniel Freeman. Incidentally, Albemarle, NC has the only post office in the world that bears the name “Albemarle,” and refers back to the first county established in North Carolina, Albemarle County, which was abolished in 1689.

Stanly County men participated in both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Stanly County sent six companies to battle during the Civil War, and the first to leave was the 14th Regiment, Company H, in 1861. One of Stanly County’s most memorable sheriffs, Isaiah W. Snuggs, was a Confederate veteran who lost his leg at the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse. “Buck” Snuggs was the county’s ninth sheriff; Snuggs’s ante-bellum home still stands on Third Street across from the fire station.

Stanly County’s seat, Albemarle, was incorporated in 1857. The county ranks 64th in area (399 square miles) in the state. The eastern border of Stanly County abuts Badin Lake and Lake Tillery, both manmade bodies of water created by the damming of the Yadkin River and the Pee Dee River. Lake Tillery is a 5,000-acre lake with 104 miles of shoreline, whose key contribution to the county is a source for hydroelectric power.

Stanly County’s western perimeter is ten miles from North Carolina’s largest county, Mecklenburg County, and is twenty miles from the largest city in the state, Charlotte. Albemarle, Stanly County’s seat, is forty-two miles northeast of Charlotte.

Written by Angela Vanore, Edited by Christine Dwyer.


- Source: J.D. Lewis - Little River, SC 
 http://www.carolana.com/

More Information

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 58,100 people, 22,223 households, and 16,156 families residing in the county. The population density was 147 people per square mile (57/km²). There were 24,582 housing units at an average density of 62 per square mile (24/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 84.67% White, 11.46% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 1.81% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.01% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. 2.13% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 22,223 households out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.30% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were non-families. 24.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.00% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 14.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 97.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,898, and the median income for a family was $43,956. Males had a median income of $31,444 versus $21,585 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,825. About 8.10% of families and 10.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.10% of those under age 18 and 10.30% of those age 65 or over.

-Source: Wikipedia

Pfeiffer University



Pfeiffer originated from a home school operated by Miss Emily Prudden in the late 19th century. In or around 1885 the school first began operation in the village of Lick Mountain in Caldwell County, North Carolina as the Ebenezer Mitchell Home and School (in honor of the family that made improvements to the property that the school owned).

A fire destroyed the school in 1908 and it moved to the nearby town of Lenoir. As that location proved inadequate, the school again relocated in 1910, this time to its current location in Misenheimer. High school diplomas began being issued by the school in 1913.

In 1928 the Mitchell school began offering junior college classes and was accredited as such in 1934. It was that year that the Pfeiffer family of New York City gave generous financial gifts to the school for construction of new buildings, and it was then that the name Pfeiffer Junior College was used.

During the 1950s the school began offering senior college courses. The four-year Pfeiffer College was accredited in 1960 during the administration of Dr. J. Lem Stokes II, President.

Pfeiffer opened a satellite campus in Charlotte, approximately forty miles away, in 1977.

In 1996 the college's trustees voted to re-organize to achieve university status, and the current name of Pfeiffer University was adopted.

- Source: Wikipedia



From: www.pfeiffer.edu/

A Message from President Chuck Ambrose       

 

Pfeiffer University first opened its doors in 1885 as a mission school founded to provide an education to students who had few opportunities for formal learning. Much has changed over the years, but Pfeiffer continues to emphasize the “service before self” principles on which we were built.

True to our history, Pfeiffer has made affordability one of its highest priorities and works with students to address financial limitations. Over 90 percent of Pfeiffer’s students receive some form of financial assistance.

 

Pfeiffer’s emphasis continues to be servant leadership. The three areas through which the University seeks to provide personal growth and academic knowledge for our students are Christian service, service or engaged learning, and co-curricular development. Pfeiffer’s Bonner Leaders program, through which students receive educational scholarships based on hours of community service, is the largest in the country. Our students participate in a variety of community service projects throughout the year, including tutoring and mentoring at area schools, building Habitat for Humanity homes, volunteering at area nursing homes, and providing service to any number of local non-profit agencies. Many of our students also participate in alternative fall and spring break mission trips, which this year has taken students to hurricane-struck Florida and an upcoming trip to Cuba.

 

A new state-of-the-art science laboratory facility, a new residence hall and a completely transformed south side of campus have continued to enhance an already student-friendly campus.

 

Pfeiffer’s goal is to educate for citizenship. If you are a student who is looking for an education that will help you develop personally as well as academically, Pfeiffer is the place for you.

 

Please consider making a visit to campus to see for yourself what our community can offer. For more information – whether you are an undergraduate, graduate or working adult seeking to complete a bachelor’s degree – please contact us via the web site or by phone.

 

Thank you for your interest in Pfeiffer. I look forward to seeing you on campus.

 

If you would like to email President Ambrose with any questions about Pfeiffer University, please email - chuck.ambrose@pfeiffer.edu

 

Discover Pfeiffer     
  

Pfeiffer Facts

Enrollment: 1271 Women, 748 Men, 2019 Total for all campuses (Fall 2008)

 

Full-Time Teaching Faculty: 67 (48 hold terminal or professional degree).

 

Full-Time Student-Full-Time Faculty Ratio: 13 to 1.

 

Undergraduate Programs of Study: Accounting, Art, Arts Administration, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Christian Education, Christian Education-Music, Christian Missions, Communication, Comprehensive Science, Education, Computer Information Systems, Criminal Justice, Economics, Elementary Education, Engineering Studies, English, Environmental Science, Exercise Science, History, Human Services, International Business, Mathematics, Mathematics-Computer Information Systems, Music, Physical Education, Political Science, Pre-Law, Pre-Medicine, Psychology, Religion, Secondary Education (licensure), Social Studies, Sociology, Special Education, Sports Management, Youth Ministries.

 

Annual Undergraduate Costs (2007-2008): Tuition $18,570; Room and Board (double room)$7,360; Medical Insurance premium $512.

 

Financial Aid: More than 90% of students receive some form or forms of aid.

 

Intercollegiate Sports (Women): Basketball, Cross Country, Cycling, Golf, Lacrosse, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball.

 

Intercollegiate Sports (Men): Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Cycling, Golf, Lacrosse, Soccer, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball.

 

Pfeiffer Facts

Enrollment: 1271 Women, 748 Men, 2019 Total for all campuses (Fall 2008)

Full-Time Teaching Faculty: 67 (48 hold terminal or professional degree).

Full-Time Student-Full-Time Faculty Ratio: 13 to 1.

Undergraduate Programs of Study: Accounting, Art, Arts Administration, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Christian Education, Christian Education-Music, Christian Missions, Communication, Comprehensive Science, Education, Computer Information Systems, Criminal Justice, Economics, Elementary Education, Engineering Studies, English, Environmental Science, Exercise Science, History, Human Services, International Business, Mathematics, Mathematics-Computer Information Systems, Music, Physical Education, Political Science, Pre-Law, Pre-Medicine, Psychology, Religion, Secondary Education (licensure), Social Studies, Sociology, Special Education, Sports Management, Youth Ministries.

Annual Undergraduate Costs (2007-2008): Tuition $18,570; Room and Board (double room)$7,360; Medical Insurance premium $512.

Financial Aid: More than 90% of students receive some form or forms of aid.

Intercollegiate Sports (Women): Basketball, Cross Country, Cycling, Golf, Lacrosse, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball.

Intercollegiate Sports (Men): Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Cycling, Golf, Lacrosse, Soccer, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball.

Pfeiffer University
at Misenheimer
P.O. Box 960
48380 U.S. Highway 52 North
Misenheimer, NC 28109

Tel. 704-463-1360 or 1-800-338-2060
Fax. 704-463-1363
www.pfeiffer.edu

 

Stanly Community College History

 

Chartered in 1971, Stanly Community College opened in temporary headquarters on the old South Albemarle High School campus that same year.  A faculty of eight instructors offered classes in auto mechanics, air conditioning and refrigeration, secretarial science, industrial management, brick masonry and business.  In five months the school grew from 31 students to almost 400, and discussion began about the possible construction of a new campus. 

 

Today the college represents more than a $13 million investment by the citizens of Stanly County.  The college serves over 10,000 students annually in all types of programs including associate degree, diploma, certificate, general education, occupational training, adult literacy and a comprehensive online degree program.  Since its inception, Stanly Community College has served over 250,000 students.

 

Read more about Stanly Community College History.

 

________________

Stanly County Museum


Stanly County is a crossroads of history.  Its people have helped mold and define the cultural landscape of the county, the state, and the nation for more than 10,000 years. Our citizens value their history and have diligently worked together to establish the Stanly County Museum to safeguard the objects of their heritage. With so many different cultures and catalysts creating history in this “land between the rivers,” the Stanly County Museum has a unique collection of artifacts—from examples of Native American art and pottery to restored pioneer homes.  We invite you to discover the rich heritage that is Stanly County, North Carolina.

Hours
Tuesday – Friday 10am-5pm
Saturday 10am-4pm
Historic Houses close at 4pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
The Museum is closed on or around all major holidays.

Tours
The Museum Gallery is self-guided. Guided tours of the Daniel Freeman house and I.W. Snuggs house are usually available daily upon request. Please call ahead to schedule a tour.

Admission
There is no admission fee. The Stanly County Museum is a public and educational service provided by Stanly County Government.


Stanly County Museum
245 East Main Street, Albemarle, NC 28001
telephone 704-986-3777 facsimile 704-986-3778

www.stanlycountymuseum.com 

History of the Freeman-Marks House

by Jonathan Underwood 

Local Albemarle merchant and civic leader Daniel Freeman is thought to have constructed this Federal style home in the early nineteenth century. However, archival evidence first mentions the house in 1847. By either date, the house is now the oldest public building still standing in Albemarle.

More 

Colson's Mill




What Happened 229 Years Ago at Colson’s Mill?

It all began in the spring of 1780. General Cornwallis’ victories in South Carolina had created enough excitement in North Carolina to inspire a loyalist force to emerge in the Yadkin River Valley under the leadership of Colonel Samuel Bryan.

About June 30, Bryan and nearly 800 men began marching south down the Yadkin-Pee Dee River Valley toward Cheraw, there to join up with General Cornwallis.

American General Griffith Rutherford ordered his adjutant, Colonel William Lee Davidson, and about 200 men to pursue the Tories, and a race ensued down the Yadkin River Valley.

Believing themselves to be out of harm’s way and close enough to Cornwallis’ headquarters to prevent attack, Bryan’s Tories pitched camp near an inn and a mill on the Cheraw Road called Colson’s.

Read More

Cotton Patch Goldmine

The Cotton Patch Goldmine
By Jeff Pickett

 

 

The Cotton Patch Gold Mine and Camp Ground is exactly that! An authentic 1800’s gold mine that is still in operation today.  With full RV hook up’s, cabins and tent sites available. Every one will enjoy recreational mining activities such as panning and sluicing for gold.

Historically, the property was known as the Crowell mine and was part of a 400 acre commercial gold mining property that operated intermittently from 1860 through out most of the early 1900’s until being sold off into smaller parcels of land. One of which is known as The Cotton Patch Gold Mine. Along with sporadic commercial operations, in 1961 the owners opened an area to the public to pan and to find gold for themselves from the tailings of the mine shafts. 

Read More

The North Carolina Gold Rush

This 1847 map of North Carolina includes an inset showing the "Gold Region."




What would it take for you to leave your family and home behind and venture to a new country? People migrate for many reasons, but basically they are trying to get away from some place that is undesirable or trying to get to a place that is more desirable. In 1799 an event occurred in the southern Piedmont that made North Carolina a very desirable place to live — the discovery of gold!

 

Twelve-year-old Conrad Reed was fishing in Little Meadow Creek on his family’s farm in Cabarrus County one day in 1799 when he found a seventeen-pound gold nugget. More gold was found in and along the creek, making Conrad’s father, John Reed, a very wealthy man. News of gold in Cabarrus County spread quickly. Soon gold was being found in neighboring counties — Montgomery, Stanly, Mecklenburg, Rowan, and Union — and people anxious to find gold of their own began moving into the area.

 

In the mid-1700s, the western portion of the southern Piedmont was a scarcely populated backcountry. Governor Arthur Dobbs visited the area in 1755 to survey land located in present-day Mecklenburg and Cabarrus counties that he had purchased ten years earlier. He found seventy-five Scots-Irish and twenty-two German families living there. He described these pioneers as “industrious people,” with most families having five to ten children. They raised livestock and crops such as corn, wheat, barley, rye, and indigo, and traded primarily with Charleston, South Carolina, some two hundred miles to the south. Charlotte, the state’s largest city today, was merely a dusty little village.

More


Badin Historical Museum


Visitors can follow the history of Badin through a collection of permanent and temporary displays at this local museum.

 

The story of Badin township begancirca 10,000 B.C. when Native Americans camped on the hill above the falls of our river and fashioned spearheads from outcroppings of rhyolite rock. Many native tribes followed, using this area until the 1700's. Settlers arrived in the 1600's and 1700's and the river was given a name: the Yadkin. Learn about the history of the town from this beginning until present day.


Hours : Sunday, 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Fees : None.

 

 

60 Falls Rd

Badin, North Carolina 28009

(704) 422-6900

http://www.badinmuseum.com/index.htm

 

Hardaway Site

During the Paleo-Indian to Early Archaic Periods (12,000-6,000 BC), prehistoric Indian populations came here to exploit the lithic resources of the area to manufacture projectile points and stone tools; these activities created stratified cultural deposits as much as four feet in depth. This site has played a significant role in the development of archeological method and theory, by advancing knowledge and understanding of the sequential development of prehistoric cultures in the eastern United States, particularly with regard to the earliest periods of human occupation.

http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceId=1877&ResourceType=Site



Morrow Mountain State Park



Enjoy the gifts of nature surrounded by the remnants of a once mighty range of peaks. Upon first encounter, the Uwharrie Mountains may seem like a mountainous mirage. These steep, rugged hills—unusual topography for the area—form a stark contrast with the rolling countryside of the piedmont plateau.

 

Recreation is plentiful in and around the waters of Lake Tillery and the Yadkin / Pee Dee River. Fishing and boating are popular pastimes. Nature lovers can pick from miles of trails to travel on foot or horseback. And for those who want to stay and take it all in, cabins and camping are available. There's really only one word to describe Morrow Mountain State Park: variety. Use the family car or RV, horseback or canoe, put on a pair of hiking boots or dip bare feet in the river, or bait your favorite fishing pole—a visit to Morrow Mountain lets you choose your kind of adventure.

Address: 49104 Morrow Mountain Road, Albemarle, NC 28001
Office Phone: (704) 982-4402

http://www.ncparks.gov/Visit/parks/momo/main.php

Email: morrow.mountain@ncmail.net


Image: Painting by Roger Thomas

Badin Lake

Tucked among tall pines and stately oaks in the heart of the Uwharrie Mountains in northeastern Stanly County, the picturesque town of Badin serves as a unique gateway for North Carolina’s central park. Settled by French employees of the L’ Aluminum Françias in the early twentieth century, Badin continues to exude the charm of a French Provincial village, reminiscent of its founders homeland.

The town, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is accessible by several main routes, but may be pleasantly approached by the Pee Dee Valley Scenic Byway that snakes around Morrow Mountain State Park and through rolling hills of rural farmland. Badin’s tree lined lanes lead to a variety of recreational activities and interesting sites, including boating, golfing swimming, fine dining, and museums. Outdoor enthusiast will appreciate the wide array and abundance of wildlife, as well as pristine forests and winding hiking trails.

Lake facts:
The reservoir covers an area of 5,350 acres, has 115 miles of shoreline, a maximum depth of 200 feet. Water fluctuations are minor.

Recreation:
Swimming area, beaches, boating, water sports, picnic areas, and fishing.

Lake Tillery

Enjoy a day in a friendly environment. The Gateway to Lake Tillery is located in Norwood, NC. The town is a reminder of how the American culture used to be, friendly people, quaint shops, and the small town charm that everyone needs to experience at least once. Let your mind wonder while enjoying a relaxing cruise up and down Lake Tillery. Be sure to stop at one of the marinas and enjoy socializing with everyone who is out and about. You’ll notice that everyone is friendly as you sail by resident’s homes that blend into the beautiful landscape that was here waiting on us. Sail down to the mouth of the Uwharrie River and enjoy hanging out on the sandbar which is in front of Morrow Mountain State Park. Drop your line and try for that illusive “big one.” Enjoy the abundance of water sports happening all over the lake. You can find all of this and more at Lake Tillery.

Lake Facts:
Lake Tillery is more than 5,000 acres with 104 miles of shoreline. A maximum depth of 70 feet and water fluctuations are minor.

Recreation:
Swimming, boating, boat rentals, fishing, water sports.

Article Courtesy:  Stanly County Convention & Visitors Bureau
More: http://www.stanlycvb.com/Lakes_Attractions.html 

Click here for More information on Stany County artist, Roger Thomas

Uwharrie National Forest

The Uwharrie National Forest was first purchased by the federal government in 1931 during the Great Depression. The land was known as the Uwharrie Reservation.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy proclaimed these federal lands in Montgomery, Randolph, and Davidson Counties the Uwharrie National Forest. It is one of the most recently formed in the National Forest System.

Though small, at only 50,189 acres, the Uwharrie  provides a variety of natural resources, including clean rivers and streams, diverse vegetation for scenery, wildlife habitat and wood products. There is also a  wide variety of recreational activities, and the Forest is a  natural setting for tourism and economic development.

Read More



Oakboro Regional Museum of History



Permanent Exhibits

 

Ancient Life of the Rocky River: Early American Artifacts

 

Early 1900 Stanly County Map: Hand-drawn and lettered, listing farm landowners

 

Photo Archives and Artifacts: Celebrating the people, organizations, and times of the area

 

Hours

 

Sunday and Monday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

 

Thursday 10:00am – 12:00pm

 

Cruise-In Hours 6:00pm – 9:00pm

 

 

For personalized Guided Tours with Groups of 8 or more

call 704-485-3612 , 704-485-8795, or 704-485-4568



Oakboro Railroad Museum

 

 

Permanent Exhibits

 

Oakboro’s original Western Union telegraph key, jacks used for track maintenance, and other memorabilia from early days.

 

A restored Norfolk Southern caboose is permanently situated on tracks on the museum site.

 

The museum also features sidewalks with engraved pavers, information kiosk, as well as information on early workers in and around Oakboro.

 

The museum was funded by a grant from the North Carolina Transportation Enhancement Program and is a joint project of the Oakboro Regional Historical Foundation and the Town of Oakboro.

 

Hours

 

Sunday and Monday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

 

Thursday 10:00am – 12:00pm

 

 

For personalized Guided Tours with Groups of 8 or more

call 704-485-3612 , 704-485-8795, or 704-485-4568




http://www.oakboro.com/Departments/museum.htm



Margaret Johnson Heritage Room

 

The Margaret Johnston Heritage Room, located in the Albemarle library, is one of the best collections of genealogy and North Carolina history in the region. It draws family researchers from across the country, and most gain new knowledge and insights through their findings in the Heritage Room. If your genealogical quest leads you to Stanly County, we will do our best to help you discover something about your Stanly ancestors.

 

Holdings include works on military history, a wide array of genealogical society journals, periodicals, census records, passenger lists, city directories, maps, cemetery records and more. The Heritage Room owns microfilm of local newspapers from as far back as the late 1800s, and contains a large number of files covering many local families, churches, and institutions.

 

In addition to North Carolina genealogy and history, the Heritage Room also has an impressive collection of Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina sources, plus some Georgia, Tennessee, and Kentucky sources.

 

Please submit your questions or comments about the Stanly County Public Library to Margaret Johnson Heritage Room either via e-mail to the Heritage Room Manager or by post to the Heritage Room, 133 East Main Street, Albemarle, North Carolina, 28001.

 

Stanly County Public Library

133 East Main Street

Albemarle, NC 28001

Ph: 704.986.3764

 

http://www.stanlycountylibrary.org/Genealogy_Resources.html

 

Mary Fisher Floyd Archives and Special Collections

The Mary Fisher Floyd Archives and Special Collections is located in the G.A. Pfeiffer Library on the main campus of Pfeiffer University. The Archives and Special Collections house the University Archives, the official repository of historically significant records of the University. In addition, students and researchers will find other collections of materials, which due to their age, format, or condition, are better cared for separate from the library's regular circulating materials. These materials are referred to as the "special collections" and include Pfeiffer University's manuscript collections, and rare books and imprints.

http://library.pfeiffer.edu/pfeifferarch.html


Lone Scout Memory Lodge





A Brief History Of the Lone Scouts of America

 

October 1915 through March 1924

 

The Beginnings

 

In 1910, William D. Boyce brought the Scouting plan to the United States and incorporated the Boy Scouts of America. He had intended the program to be for all boys. In 1915, because he was disturbed that farm and country boys were being left out of Scouting because of their isolation and inability to meet in Troop size groups, he organized the Lone Scouts of America, LSA. In the LSA, a boy, by himself, or with a few others, could enjoy Scouting, without any major expenses.  Because of Boyce's background in publishing, and given the remoteness of the LSA membership, LSA had a strong program of writing and correspondence.

 

The first advertisement for this new organization appeared in Boyce's Chicago Ledger on October 30, 1915 and possibly also in the Saturday Blade and the Farming Business. Simultaneously, the first issue of Lone Scout magazine was delivered to each of his approximately 20,000 paper carriers. The LSA program was an instant hit, and started growing just like the BSA before it.

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