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Anson

Cities and Towns in Anson County

Click on the towns below to visit their websites

Ansonville

Lilesville

McFarlan 

Morven

Peachland

Polkton

Wadesboro

Anson County political parties

Democrat
Republican
Libertarian

Schools

891 Hwy. 742 South
Wadesboro, NC 28170
Ph: (704) 694-3348
Fax: (704) 694-7876
 
680 Highway 74 West
Polkton, NC 28135
Ph: (704) 272-5395
Fax: (704) 272-6155
 
96 Anson High Road
Wadesboro, NC 28170
Ph: (704) 694-9301
Fax: (704) 694-4570
 
PH: (704) 694-7447
 
832 US Hwy 52 North
Wadesboro, NC 28170
Ph: (704) 694-3945
Fax: (704) 694-5209
 
9104 US Hwy. 52 North
Ansonville, NC 28007
Ph: (704) 826-8337
Fax: (704) 826-6136
 
121 Camden Street
Lilesville, NC 28091
Ph: (704) 848-4975
Fax: (704) 848-4205
 
6715 US Hwy 52 South
Morven, NC 28119
Ph: (704) 851-9306
Fax: (704) 851-3074
 
9633 US Highway 74 West
Peachland, NC 28133
Ph: 704-272-8061
Fax: 704-272-9278
 
321 Camden Road
Wadesboro, NC 28170
Ph: (704) 694-9383
Fax: (704) 694-5816
 
1542 Hwy 52 South
Wadesboro, NC 28170
Ph: (704) 694-4423
Fax: (704) 695-1490

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Churches

Bethel Church

Wadesboro

 

Bethlehem Church

Aquadale

 

Brown Creek Church

Polkton

 

Camden Church

Russellville

 

Cappadocia Church  

Olive Branch

 

Cedar Creek Church  

Mount Croghan

 

Cedar Grove Church  

Polkton

 

Cedar Hill Church  

Aquadale

 

Centenary Church  

Lilesville

 

Concord Church  

Aquadale

 

Deep Creek Church  

Mount Croghan

 

Deep Spring Church  

Olive Branch

 

Ebenezer Church  

Lilesville

 

Elizabeth Church  

Lilesville

 

Ellen Grove Church  

Hornsboro

 

Flat Rock Church  

Lilesville

 

Flat Rock Church  

Wadesboro

 

Forestville Church  

Lilesville

 

Forestville Zion Church  

Ansonsville

 

Galilee Church  

Morven East

 

Garris Grove Church  

Lilesville

 

Gatewood Station Church  

Wadesboro

 

Gum Springs Church  

Lilesville

 

Hanna Church  

Wadesboro

 

Hebron Church  

Mangum

 

Hopewell Church  

Polkton

 

Jerusalem Church  

Olive Branch

 

Long Pine Church  

Mount Croghan

 

Madison Grove Church  

Wadesboro

 

Meltonville Church  

Marshville

 

Mineral Springs Church  

Russellville

 

Mount Beulah Church  

Wadesboro

 

Mount Carmel Church  

Marshville

 

Mount Olive Church  

Hornsboro

 

Mount Pleasant Church  

Ansonville

 

Mount Vernon Church  

Polkton

 

New Grove Church  

Russellville

 

New Home Church  

Olive Branch

 

New Hope Church  

Morven West

 

New Zion Church  

Marshville

 

Oak Dale Church  

Polkton

 

Oak Grove Church  

Morven West

 

Parson Grove Church  

Wadesboro

 

Pine Grove Church  

Wadesboro

 

Pleasant Hill Church  

Lilesville

 

Pleasant Hill Church  

Wadesboro

 

Pleasant Hill Church  

Polkton

 

Poplar Hill Church  

Russellville

 

Poplar Spring Church  

Aquadale

 

Ramah Grove Church  

Morven East

 

Red Hill Church  

Ansonville

 

Red Hill Church  

Polkton

 

Rock Hill Church  

Lilesville

 

Rocky Mount Church  

Oakboro

 

Salem Church  

Ansonville

 

Sandy Plains Church  

Morven West

 

Sandy Ridge Church  

Morven West

 

Saron Church  

Polkton

 

Shady Grove Church  

Lilesville

 

Shilo Church  

Lilesville

 

Streaters Grove Church  

Morven West

 

Union Church  

Russellville

 

Unity Chapel  

Russellville

 

West Deep Creek Church  

Mount Croghan

 

West Rocky Ford Church  

Russellville

 

Wightman Church  

Aquadale


Note on Churches:
  North Carolina is blessed to boast hundreds of churches in every county.  We make every effort to list each church in each county.  If your church is not listed in our directory, please let us know.

Do you have roots in Anson County?
If so, click the link below:


____________________ 

About Anson County

By John Jennings Dunlap, III

 

The beginning

    

When was Anson County formed?  1748?  1749?  Or 1750?  Take your choice and you will be partially correct.

    

In 1748, two delegations appeared before the Royal Governor Gabriel Johnston. One group petitioned for the establishment of a new county; the other opposed such formation. After consideration, the Governor read into the records — “by virtue of the power vested in me, I do create...a county, by the name of Anson County, by itself, separate and independent.” The Assembly still had to approve. Also in September 1748, the Governor and council named Justices of The Peace and the Sheriff.

    

In 1749, the bill in the Assembly creating the county did not complete passage although many thought it done. This date was used when Anson County observed its Bicentennial in October 1949.

    

The bill finally was passed and gained assent by the Royal Governor on April 9, 1750, the legal date of establishment.  

 

Why form a new County?

    

Settlers continued to move west.  Remember in the early 1700s this area was the western frontier.  As a result some had to travel more than 100 miles to the courthouse in Bladen.   The trip took several days to go and return.  This made business and government almost impossible.  The Governor realized this.  Distance and poor roads were the primary reasons for allowing the formation of a new county.

 

How large was this new County of Anson?

    

Anson County was huge, much too large even from the start.  Its boundary to the east was not the Pee Dee River as it is now.  In fact, the eastern boundary was Drowning Creek and the Lumbee (Lumber) River now located in  Robeson County.  Bordered on the north by Virginia and Granville’s claim, and on the south by South Carolina, Anson extended west to the Mississippi River or wherever the charter of Carolina indicated, possibly to the Pacific. What later became the state of Tennessee was included.

 

For how long was Anson County this size?

    

Not long.  Rowan County to the north was established in 1753, and Mecklenburg to the west was formed in 1762.  The territory that became Tennessee was ceded back to the United States Government in 1790 and became a state in 1796.

 

Who was Anson County named for?

    

Anson was named for Admiral George Anson, First Lord of the Admiralty, highest ranking officer of the British Navy.  Anson was the third Englishman to sail around the world.

 

Who settled Anson?

    

A great number of the settlers were Scots-Irish and Germans.  Some French families settled the area.  Scots, Welsh and Englishmen also settled here.

    

When formed, most of the population was located between Drowning Creek and the Pee Dee River.  However, the population west of the Pee Dee continued to grow from the 1750s.  They moved farther west as the years passed.

 

Most settlers came up the Cape Fear from Wilmington, up the Pee Dee from Georgetown and Charlestown.  Others followed Indian and animal trails and other settlers from Pennsylvania through Virginia to Carolina lands.

 

 

 

John Jennings Dunlap, III is President of the Anson County Historical Society

 

Anson County Historical Society

206 East Wade St.

Wadesboro, NC  28170

 

Phone:  704-694-6694

Fax:  704-694-3763

 

Email:  ansonhistorical@windstream.net

 

__________________

 

 

More Information

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 25,275 people, 9,204 households, and 6,663 families residing in the county. The population density was 48 people per square mile (18/km²). There were 10,221 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 49.53% White, 48.64% Black or African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.57% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. 0.83% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,204 households out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.80% were married couples living together, 19.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.60% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.20% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 22.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,849, and the median income for a family was $35,870. Males had a median income of $27,297 versus $20,537 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,853. About 15.50% of families and 17.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.90% of those under age 18 and 16.70% of those age 65 or over.

- Source: Wikipedia

Boggan Hammond House Museum



The 18th-century Boggan-Hammond House, the first restored historic building in Anson County, was built by Capt. Patrick Boggan, donor of the land for the town of Wadesborough.  Chartered as New Town in 1783, the present name of the county seat was adopted in 1878.  Boggan and his brother-in-law, Col. Thomas Wade, were among the founders of the town.  Patrick Boggan was a Revolutionary War leader and an ardent Anson Regulator.
  

The Boggan-Hammond House was built by Boggan for his daughter Nellie who married William Hammond.  The house is furnished in period furnishings which include a rope bed with trundle, a flax wheel and an arm chair that belonged to the Boggans.  The colors used in the house are original as are the floors.


Anson County Historical Society
206 East Wade St.
Wadesboro, NC  28170

Phone:  704-694-6694
Fax:  704-694-3763

Email:  ansonhistorical@windstream.net
www.ansonhistoricalsociety.org

Historic Uptown Wadesboro

     The Uptown Wadesboro business district boasts architecture reminiscent of its long history as a cotton and textile town when Wadesboro was the center of shopping, entertainment and dining for all of Anson County.
     Years ago, young and old traveled into Wadesboro from the surrounding countryside to visit the many shops that lined the streets of Uptown streets. A variety of businesses including women's dress shops, dry goods stores, hardware stores, soda fountains, dimes stores, a tea room, a bowling alley and a movie theatre, offered such an assortment of shopping that no one left the county. That shopping district is still alive and offers visitors to our town modern day shopping in an historic setting.
     The Town of Wadesboro is proud to be a Main Street town in the NC Main Street Program since 1984.  Wadesboro's business district has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1999.
     For more information, visit www.uptownwadesboro.com.


Shady Oaks



Experience life as it was almost 200 years ago

You can at Shady Oaks Plantation Bed and Breakfast in Ansonville, North Carolina. This once-working plantation originally spread over 900 acres from highway 52 to the Pee Dee River and produced tobacco and cotton. Now significantly restored, the restoration includes the main house, the servants' quarters, a three-story vintage barn, a large stocked lake, a hot tub and swimming pool plus numerous other outbuildings dotting the beautiful tree-lined landscape.

The majestic main house includes six double bedrooms and two single bedrooms while the servants quarters, still in the process of being restored, have four efficiency units, each sleeping four people on two floors and a one-apartment building originally used for curing and storing meat products. -- perfect for visitors who wish to taste history and to prepare their own food.


www.shadyoaksplantation.com

Ansonia Theater Project



Architect's Rendering of Ansonia Theatre Renovation Project
The Ansonia Theatre
in Uptown Wadesboro North Carolina
(Built 1925)

A combination movie and vaudeville theater, the Ansonia Theatre was built in 1925 and for decades served as the cultural center for Anson county.  Even as late as the '50s and early '60s, the Ansonia was still showing regular movies with local bands performing after the late show on weekends. Then as television and mall cinemas gained a stronghold in American culture and as people became more mobile, the Ansonia, like most movie theaters in small towns, eventually closed.  Although several attempts were made to reopen it, there was no way it could compete with larger cinemas.

The Ansonia is located in the historic business district of Uptown Wadesboro and is included in the area listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  All citizens of Anson County can be proud of its rich cinema and vaudeville past. 

Anson County leaders have long recognized that this grand old facility can again become the center of cultural events and spark positive development of the total county. The Ansonia Theatre is currently being renovated and revitalized as a performing arts theater and community auditorium.


For more information and details on the Ansonia Theatre project, please see the
Anson County Arts Council website or click on the link below to be directed to the page relating to the Ansonia.  There will be information on the Arts Council website about how you too can support the dream of revitalizating this important cultural landmark in Anson County.




The Ashe-Covington Building in Wadesboro was given to the Historical Society in June 2000 by Time-Warner Cablevision Co.  The small structure was previously owned by Dr. Edmund S. Ashe, who built in around 1890, and then Dr. Jimmy Covington. 

Knowing the vital part the medical profession has played in the lives of Ansonians, the Society board decided to establish a medical museum in the building to serve as a lasting tribute to Anson's doctors and nurses.

Many medical artifacts have been donated to the museum and more have been promised.


http://www.ansonhistoricalsociety.org/museums/ashecovingtonmedical.html


The Leavitt House



The Leavitt House is the oldest commercial building still in use in Anson County.  It was constructed in 1832 as a residence for Norfleet Boggan.  Wadesboro's only antebellum frame commercial building is a fine example of the Greek Revival Style.  The heavy double paneled door of the main entrance was origanally surrounded with many-paned beveled glass.  The former parlor features a mantled plaster cornice and ceiling medallion.

Nathaniel Knight purchased the house in 1867 and converted it into an Inn and added a rear wing for use as a kitchen.  It remained a hotel under the proprietorship of Charles Burns and others until Harvey Leavitt, Sr. adapted its use as a funeral home in 1935.  Mr. Leavitt's grandson, Harvey Leavitt III gave the Leavitt House to the Anson County Historical Society in January 2007.  It is now being used as a museum to house the Tom Little Artifacts, the F.C. Allen Arrowhead collection, and a Wadesboro High School Memorabilia room, plus other collections.
 

http://www.ansonhistoricalsociety.org/museums/leavitthouse.html


Alexander Little Wing



This name designates the 19th-century portion of the house, built and added to the original structure in 1839 by Alexander Little, who purchased the property from Dr. Thomas D. Parke.  The furnishings of the house include a butler's desk, a Pembroke table and a Hepplewhite chest.  Patchwork quilts and hand-woven coverlids are used in each of the houses. 

The museums have been awarded the Cannon Cup by the NC Society for Preservation of Antiquities and the Halifax Resolves Award presented by the Historic Halifax Restoration Association.  In 1972 the houses were entered on the prestigious National Register of Historical Places.

http://www.ansonhistoricalsociety.org/museums/alexanderlittlewing.html


HW Little & Co.

     

Anson County's oldest retail business (1895) and still offers hardware essentials, including paint, lumber, plywood, plumbing supplies, fertilizer, assorted tools, gardening tools and equipment. Fishing rods and reels, hooks, sinkers, line and bobbers are also available.
 www.hwlittle.doitbest.com

Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge

     Situated along the Pee Dee River, the 8,443-acre Refuge is located a few hundred yards from the once famous "Lockhart Gaddy Wild Goose Refuge.” In the 1950's, Gaddy's pond welcomed each year more than 10,000 Canada geese. In October 1963, the Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge was established to help further provide additional habitat for these geese and other waterfowl.
     Presently the wintering waterfowl numbers can fluctuate greatly from year to year, but can exceed 10,000 birds during a season. Cooperative farming in field impoundments, water level management, and the bottomland hardwood forest along Brown Creek provide excellent habitat for waterfowl and other wildlife.
     The Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge has more than just waterfowl. In fact, the refuge also supports an abundance of nesting neotropical migratory birds, bobwhite quail, wild turkey, and white-tailed deer.
     The diversity of habitat and management provides for more than 168 bird species, 49 reptiles and amphibians, 28 mammals, and 20 fish species.
     Refuge lands include the following habitat types: bottomland hardwood forest (3,000 acres), upland pine forest (1,500 acres), mixed pine/hardwood forest (2,000 acres), crop lands (1,000 acres), old fields, native warm season grass fields, and openings (1,000 acres).
For more information, visit www.fws.gov/peedee.